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English History

ENGLISH HISTORY 1866: First Female Doctor Elizabeth Garrett Anderson Set-Up All Women’s Hospital

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#AceHistoryDesk – Elizabeth Garrett Anderson was described in her time as a woman of indomitable will who did not suffer fools gladly. Her father was a prosperous businessman in Aldeburgh in Suffolk, who believed that girls should have as good an education as boys and she was educated at home with some teenage years at a boarding school for girls.

Medical pioneer: Elizabeth Garrett Anderson, c.1888.
Medical pioneer: Elizabeth Garrett Anderson, c.1888.

When Elizabeth decided she wanted to be a doctor, her father was supportive but her mother was horrified. Most doctors and surgeons did not want a woman joining their ranks.

Nor did medical colleges and her applications to teaching hospitals and universities were turned down. Sneaking in as a nurse at the Middlesex Hospital in London failed to work and she hit on becoming a licentiate of the Society of Apothecaries, which though less prestigious than an MD, or doctorate of medicine, would entitle her to be a practising physician. The Society shrank back in alarm, but her father threatened to sue it and she passed the exams in 1865. It then revised its rules to keep women out.

In 1866 Elizabeth opened the St Mary’s Dispensary for Women and Children in the Marylebone area of London, a hospital solely for women, staffed solely by women, which drew crowds of poor patients.

In 1870 she obtained the University of Paris’s first ever MD degree for a woman and in 1872 her Marylebone dispensary became the New Hospital for Women. In 1871, aged 34, Elizabeth married James George Skelton Anderson, head of a large shipping firm, who supported her belief in independence for married women. The barriers were giving way and in 1874 she helped to found the London School of Medicine for Women, where she taught for years.

Elizabeth also supported the suffragettes. In 1902 she and her husband retired to Aldeburgh, where she became mayor in 1908, the first woman mayor in Britain. When she died there in 1917 aged 81 her London hospital was renamed after her in her honour.

#AceNewsDesk report ………..Published: Sept.29:  2022:

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World History & Research Reports

HISTORY TODAY: INAH REPORT: Archaeologists identify obsidian mines exploited by the people of Teōtīhuacān

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#AceNewsDesk – For thousands of years, people living in the Sierra de las Navajas have exploited the rare deposits of obsidian, a type of volcanic glass that is formed when lava extruded from a volcano cools rapidly with minimal crystal growth according to Published: 27, 2022

shutterstock 788556172
Header Image Credit : National Institute of Anthropology and History

Obsidian is produced from felsic lava, rich in the lighter elements such as silicon, oxygen, aluminium, sodium, and potassium. Due to the hard and brittle nature of the stone, it fractures to form extremely sharp edges, often used as cutting and piercing tools, instruments for worship, or for weapons manufacturing by the pre-hispanic groups living in the Americas.

INAH
Image Credit : National Institute of Anthropology and History

The deposits are located only 31 miles from the ancient city of Teōtīhuacān, for which researchers from the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) have located more than 500 mine shafts in the Sierra de las Navajas, a mountain range located in the south-southeast of the state of Hidalgo in central Mexico.

Teōtīhuacān, named by the nahuatl-speaking aztecs, and loosely translated as “birthplace of the gods” is an ancient mesoamerican city located in the Teōtīhuacān valley. During phase II from AD 100 to 350, the city population rapidly grew into a large metropolis, partly due to the economic pull and opportunities a thriving urban settlement presented, but also based on environmental factors suggested by the eruption of the Xitle volcano, forcing the migration from other settlements out of the central valley.Teōtīhuacān – Image Credit : Shutterstock (Copyright)

It was during this phase that many of the most notable monuments within Teōtīhuacān were constructed, including: the Pyramid of the Sun (the third largest ancient pyramid after the Great Pyramid of Cholula and the Great Pyramid of Giza), the Pyramid of the Moon, the Avenue of the Dead, and the Ciudadela with the Temple of the Feathered Serpent Quetzalcoatl.

Among the mines discovered, identifying shafts that date from the Teōtīhuacān era presented challenges to the researchers, as many were reused or sealed during the Toltec exploitation of the region between AD 950 to AD 1150, and then during the period of the Triple Alliance by the three Nahua city-states: Mexico-Tenochtitlan, Tetzcoco, and Tlacopan during the 16th century AD.

By conducting an analysis of mined obsidian, as well as the discovery of ceramic pieces and architecture containing obsidian pieces that coincides with the Teōtīhuacān temporality, the researchers have been able to gain new insights into the daily operation of obsidian mining during the Teōtīhuacān era which were transported and refined in workshops.

“The main production in the deposits of the sierra were the preforms, and considering that Teōtīhuacān carving is very special, to the extent that a single wrong blow can ruin the raw material, it should have been more efficient to make the preforms in the deposit and finish the spikes in Teōtīhuacān”, said Alejandro Pastrana Cruz from the Directorate of Archaeological Studies of the National Institute of Anthropology and History.

INAH

#AceNewsDesk report ………..Published: Sept.29:  2022:

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World History & Research Reports

HISTORY TODAY: Filling the Gaps: By writing in margins please’s some but not everyone

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#AceHistoryDesk – Writing in a book is a divisive action in the modern day with some writing in the Margins

 17th-century manicule and notes in the margin of translations of Aristotle. Courtesy of the Penn Library.
17th-century manicule and notes in the margin of translations of Aristotle. Courtesy of the Penn Library.

Filling the Gaps: The degree of severity of this potential offense often depends on the nature of the book being marked and the type of mark being made.

In the early modern period, such a dichotomy did not exist. Love them or hate them, marginal annotations and other marks of readership are not a new concept. Early modern readers were encouraged to engage actively with texts by marking and annotating their books. These annotations were most often directly relevant to the passages of printed text they surrounded, but not always. 

For some bibliophiles, marking the most meaningful paragraphs of their favorite novels is the ultimate act of appreciation; for others, it’s the ultimate act of defilement.

Annotations and marks such as these are invaluable as evidence of readership practices in the 16th and 17th centuries. Their intrinsic value is in what they can tell us about the interests of early modern readers. Most reading was undertaken with a purpose, with a view to a specific end – social, political or professional advancement, for example. Considering the serious, intellectual, scholarly and often religious nature of most early modern texts, the majority of text-related annotations in these volumes constitute what historians term ‘aids to memory’. 

These aids came in many different forms and in varying degrees of intensity, which suggest the differing levels of engagement with the text itself. Most common, perhaps, were marks and symbols, such as an asterisk or a manicule (a pointing finger), in the margins of a page next to specific sentences or passages of particular importance.

In some instances, readers summarised the contents of a page with a sub-heading, of sorts, at the top of a page. More often, these handwritten memory aids extended into verbal summaries or short commentaries on paragraphs or points those readers found significant or pertinent to their reason for reading. Sometimes marginalia filled up the entirety of the blank page surrounding the text, leaving very little white space. Occasionally small drawings could be detailed in the margins, illustrating the content of the text. A volume from the library of Anthony Higgin, Dean of Ripon from 1608 to 1624, contains a small illustration of a crocodile in the margin of one page, followed by a drawing of the sun (complete with a smiley face) and the moon adjacent to their textual descriptions.

Paper was reasonably expensive in the 16th and 17th centuries and was a major contributor to the cost of books.

As such, the blank pages at the front and back and the white space surrounding the printed text were often the most readily available scrap paper. Sometimes we see instances of random sayings or witticisms being scribbled onto the blank pages of a book – the saying ‘God hath woollen feet but iron hands’ written in the front of a volume now in the Gorton Chest library in Chetham’s Library, Manchester, is a particularly good example. Marginalia illustrating a fight in Livy’s Ab Urbe Condita, 16th century. Mary Evans/Kings College London.

marginalia illustrating a fight in Livy’s Ab Urbe Condita, 16th century.

Marginalia and notes in books that do not directly relate to the printed text often also evidence a book’s value as a possession, both to individuals and to generations of families. Numerous volumes from Anthony Higgin’s library contain his signature in various forms. Several volumes in the Francis Trigge Chained Library in Grantham contain examples of ownership inscriptions as well, names like ‘Thomas Scarborough, Parish Clerk’ or ‘Edward Eastland, His Book’.

Perhaps one of the most significant examples of the importance of owning books and the significance of inheritance is a copy of Protestant reformer John Calvin’s Sermons upon the Book of Job, also now in the Trigge Library. This volume contains no less than six instances of ownership inscriptions throughout the book by one James Higginbotham. In one of the inscriptions, Higginbotham notes that the volume was given to him by his father, William, on 5 November 1704. William Higginbotham himself inscribed the book with his signature, dated 1688, suggesting its importance across several generations. The book also contains the signature of one John Bentley from 1693 – perhaps William loaned the book to his friend. 

Books could also serve as places to note down recipes or keep a record of accounts, particularly in the blank sheets at the beginning and end.

The pages at either end of one volume in the Gorton Chest library, for example, are covered with what seem to be accounts, written out in such detail that there is very little white space left on the pages. A volume from Higgin’s collection has one of its blank pages covered in recipes for various remedies and medicines, including ‘a drink for divers deseses’ and ‘a medissine for all kind of griefes’. Similarly, the ‘medecyne for the ague’ recorded on the blank page at the front of a book in the Trigge Library seems to have been considered important (or effective) enough to note down for repeated use.

Surviving marginalia is thus a central piece of evidence for the importance of early modern books, both as textual items whose messages were read, understood, interpreted, and applied, but also as material objects that held personal and familial significance as heirlooms and repositories of more general information.

Jessica G. Purdy is Associate Lecturer in Early Modern History at the University of St Andrews.

#AceNewsDesk report ………..Published: Sept.24: 2022:

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Australian History

AUSTRALIA HISTORY: A vital piece of Broome’s WWII has been restored after spending nearly three decades exposed to the harsh elements of northern WA.

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#AceHistoryDesk – Broome plane wreck could uncover lost secrets of deadly World War II air raid

Old plane propeller and engine covered in blue tape.
The engine comes from one of five Dorniers wrecked off the coast of north-west Western Australia.(ABC KIMBERLEY: Tallulah Bieundurry)none

The Dornier flying boat engine has been on display at the Broome Historical Museum since the late 1970s, after it was retrieved from wrecks off the coast of Broome.

It is one of five Dorniers wrecked off the coast of the North West during the air raid of 1942, an attack on the port city that left 88 dead.

The engine at the museum is only one of two that have been retrieved, but years buried in the depths of Broome’s turquoise waters left it worse for wear.

Kimberley king tides and mudflats caused severe erosion over its years at sea, leaving its metal engine rusted and flaking apart.

Old plane engine covered in rust
Layers of rust and corrosion covered the engine for decades before conservation treatment. (ABC Kimberley: Tallulah Bieundurry)none

Last week, the museum was paid a visit by a team specializing in industrial repair and metal restoration to bring the piece of Broome’s history back to life.

Metals conservator Vanessa Roth travelled hundreds of kilometres to take part, and she initially had concerns about how well the conservation would work due to the level of degradation. 

“When things go into the water, there’s a period where deterioration happens very quickly,” she said. 

“A calcium carbonate crust starts to help things settle … but if you disturb it again, then it starts to deteriorate quite quickly.” 

The race was on to save the engine, but Ms Roth was careful to keep its authenticity.

“We are trying to preserve the significant qualities of an artefact and its history, we don’t necessarily try and make it look brand new,” she said. The remnants of a Dutch Dornier flying boat 75 years after it was destroyed by a Japanese air raid on Broome.(Supplied: Stephen Van Der Mark)none

Michael Lake is a member of the Broome Historical Society, and he said displaying the engine outside has had some benefits to the artefact’s preservation. 

“The blessing is that every wet season, the engine gets doused with nice, fresh rainwater,” he said.

“The thing is …we needed to do something to preserve it in a better condition.” 

Method of Conservation

Typical methods of conservation were going to be difficult in the harsh climate of Broome, with remoteness being the biggest issue but Ms Roth was open to trying new treatments for the engine. 

“A lot of things taken out from the ocean undergo a process of electrolysis, where it’s put into a particular solution and then attached to an electric current,” she said.

“There was a big risk that it could all fall apart in a solution, so we looked to what other methods could be used.”

Sponge-blasting was recommended, which could potentially take out chlorides from the metals and remove corrosion, so the team pushed on. 

Exposing historic details

When the clean-up was done, it revealed a previously hidden serial numbers buried under layers of rust.

“I’m really thrilled that the sponge-blasting has been able to preserve and reveal a lot of detail,” Ms Roth said.

“Now that we have markings on the engine components, we can get a specialist in to do lot more research.”Sponge-blasting revealed serial numbers on the engine. (ABC Kimberley: Tallulah Bieundurry)none

The serial numbers will open the door for further research into the Broome air raid and the World War II era. 

Conservation treatment has been on the agenda for more than a decade.

Various grants, including support from the Netherlands Embassy and the Consulate General in Australia, have aided the museum to tick it off the list.

Mr Lake said he was glad the historic artefact can be appreciated as a vital part of the Broome air raid collection.

“It’s a very visual reminder for those who walk through the museum of our history,” he said.

The engine is one of five Dorniers wrecked off the coast of the north-west, only 2 of which have been retrieved. The other is on display at the Broome airport.

With regular lanolin coatings and protection from the elements, the engine is expected to stay in good condition for another 40 years. 

#AceNewsDesk report ………..Published: Sept.24: 2022:

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World History & Research Reports

BRITISH HISTORY: Life & Death of Frank Hornby Who Created Meccano & Model Railways

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#AceHistoryDesk – Death of Frank Hornby: The genius who created Meccano, Hornby model railways and Dinky toys and died a millionaire at the age of 73 was born in Liverpool in 1863.

Frank Hornby
History Today: Frank Hornby

Frank Hornby’s father worked in the wholesale provision trade, the family straddled the divide between the upper working class and lower middle class, and Frank spoke with a Scouse accent all his life. He disliked school, often played truant, and left at 16.

Years later he recalled that he had read Self-Help by Samuel Smiles over and over again and it inspired him, but for the moment he made little progress and after various clerking jobs he became a bookkeeper at a Liverpool meat importing firm run by a man named David Elliott.

By the late 1890s, Hornby was married with two small sons. He made toys for his boys at home in his garden shed, building metal models of bridges, cranes, and lorries.

An inspired moment came when he thought of making them out of identical parts that could be fastened together with screws and nuts to assemble whichever model was wanted. The separate parts were metal strips half an inch wide with holes for the fastenings at regular half-inch intervals. They came in three standard lengths. The only tools a boy needed to assemble the models were spanners and a screwdriver.

Early in 1901 Hornby took out a patent after borrowing £5 from his boss for the fee. David Elliott saw the possibilities and backed Hornby.

They set up a separate business and in 1902 the first ‘Mechanics Made Easy’ sets went on sale at 7s 6d (equivalent to £30 or more today), each with an instruction leaflet explaining how to make 12 models. They began to sell and in 1906 the enterprise made a profit for the first time.

The toys were educational as well as enjoyable and the business went from strength to strength.

The ‘Meccano’ trademark was registered in 1907 and in 1908 Meccano Ltd itself was formed. Elliot was a sleeping partner, leaving Hornby in command. Meccano sets were exported to numerous countries and offices were opened in Paris, Berlin, Barcelona, and the United States. Hornby had never imagined for a moment that girls would be interested in Meccano and the product was aimed entirely at boys.

In later developments, the firm introduced the monthly Meccano Magazine in 1916, Hornby clockwork model trains in 1920 (by 1930 they were outselling Meccano), and Dinky Toy cars, lorries, and buses in 1933.

A rich man in his later years, Hornby owned a grand mansion in Maghull outside Liverpool. He was also Conservative MP for Everton in the 1930s, but his greatest impact was on the generations of children who loved his toys.

#AceNewsDesk report ………..Published: Sept.24: 2022:

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World History & Research Reports

HISTORY TODAY: Ancient shipwreck reveals the tenacity of traders and a lost age of Mediterranean trade

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#AceHistoryDesk – A surprise storm? An inexperienced captain?

Whatever the reason, the merchant ship made of fir and walnut trees, and fresh from far-off lands, sank in shallow waters off modern-day Israel more than 1,200 years ago.

At the time the largely Christian Byzantine Empire was losing its grip on this area of the eastern Mediterranean, and Islamic rule was extending its reach.

But this newly-discovered shipwreck, dated to the seventh or eighth century AD, is evidence trade continued with the rest of the Mediterranean during that period according to Professor Deborah Cvikel, a nautical archaeologist at the University of Haifa and director of the dig.

a diver takiong notes on a clipboard underwater with the timber wreck of a ship around them
The 25-metre cargo ship is from the seventh or eighth century AD.(Reuters: Alexandros Sotiriou)none

” The history books, they usually tell us that … commerce almost stopped,’ she said.

“There was no international commerce in the Mediterranean. We had mainly smaller vessels sailing along the coast doing cabotage.”

But this no longer seems to be the case.

“Here we have a large shipwreck, which we think the original ship was around 25 metres long, and … laden with cargo from all over the Mediterranean.”

Artefacts on deck show the ship had docked in Cyprus, Egypt, maybe Turkey and perhaps as far away as the North African coast.

The excavation is backed by the Israel Science Foundation, Honor Frost Foundation and the Institute of Nautical Archaeology at Texas A&M University.

The Israeli coast is home to many ships that sank over the millennia.Vessels were found with Mediterranean ingredients, like olives, dates, and figs, still inside. (Reuters: Amir Yurman)none

The wrecks are more accessible to study than elsewhere in the Mediterranean because the sea is shallow and the sandy bottom preserves artefacts.

A storm might shift the sands and expose a relic, which is what happened with this new discovery at the Israeli coastal community of Maagan Michael.

Two amateur divers spotted a piece of wood sticking out from the bottom and reported it to authorities.

Ancient ingredients

Eight excavation seasons later, Professor Cvikel’s team has mapped out much of the 20-metre-long, five-metre-wide wooden skeleton that remains.The ship is thought to have sunk more than 1,200 years ago. (Reuters: Rony Levinson)none

Using underwater vacuums to clear out 1.5 metres of sand, they found more than 200 amphoras which still held Mediterranean ingredients like fish sauce, and a variety of olives, dates and figs.

There were also ropes and wooden combs, as well as animals, including the remains of beetles and six rats.

“You have to be very attentive because some of the remains, like fish bones, or rat bones, or olive pits, they are so tiny that it could be lost in a split second,” Professor Cvikel said.

Some of the cargo bore symbols of the Christian Byzantine church and others had writing in Arabic.

Researchers hope to find a hall to display the ship in its entirety to the public, otherwise they will cover it with sand and leave it at the sea bottom with the other wrecks.

Reuters

#AceNewsDesk report ………..Published: Sept.24: 2022:

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Australian History

AUSTRALIA HISTORY: Red Dust Revival sparks huge turnout of vintage cars, motorcycles at Lake Perkolilli

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#AceHistoryDesk – Red Dust Revival: One of Australia’s oldest motor racing tracks has roared back to life, more than a century after it became a playground for pioneers on West Australia’s Goldfields.

a vintage car racing on a dry, red dirt lake bed.
Cars can reach well over 160kph racing on Lake Perkolilli.(ABC Goldfields: Jarrod Lucas)none

About 150 vintage cars and motorcycles from across the country are racing on the hard claypan surface at Lake Perkolilli on the outskirts of the historic gold mining city of Kalgoorlie-Boulder.

The Red Dust Revival event has attracted hundreds of spectators as vintage car lovers re-enact races held there before World War II. 

Russell Platts has spent much of the event waving the chequered flag as one of the race marshals and says he has the best seat in the house.

“We can smell the action here, it’s so close, I love it,” he said.

“We’re right here on the start and finish line, nice and close, it’s the best seat for sure.”

A man in a white coat waves the chequered flag at a vintage race car.
Russell Platts says he has the best view of the action.(ABC Goldfields: Jarrod Lucas)none

Organiser Graeme Cocks said it took an army of volunteers many months of planning to stage the event.

He said the interest from around the country had been overwhelming.

“With the three-year break, we’ve had people building cars all over Australia — from Tasmania to Queensland to Darwin — and we’ve got three times the number of cars here this time,” Mr Cocks said.

“There’s now a big shortage of spare parts because everyone has bought it all up.”Organiser Graeme Cocks says 105 vintage cars and 40 motorcycles registered for the Red Dust Revival.(ABC Goldfields: Jarrod Lucas)none

‘It’s very nostalgic’

Between 1914 and 1939, speed records were set on the lake’s hard, smooth surface at a time before quality roads were built.

But WWII put an end to the legendary races as fuel and men became scarce.Cars line up at the starters’ line on Lake Perkolilli.(ABC Goldfields: Jarrod Lucas)none

Among the most determined to make the trip west for the event was Johnno Everett, who lives on the outskirts of Sydney.

He drove his 1928 Model A Ford nearly 4,000 kilometres across the Nullarbor.

Most towed their vehicles or put them on trucks.A sign at Lake Perkolilli points to other famous race tracks around the world.   (ABC Goldfields: Jarrod Lucas)none

Kevin Boardman attended the last event in 2019 and has made the journey again from Goulburn in New South Wales.

“It’s very nostalgic,” he said, while leaning against the tyre of his 1914 T Model Ford speedster.

“The thing is this race meeting was very unique back in the days when it ran.

“It’s the oldest racecourse in Australia, exactly the same as it was back in 1914.”A race car driver and crowd at Lake Perkolilli claypan racetrack near Kalgoorlie in 1928.(Supplied: WA Museum)none

Family affair rebuilding car

Matt Harrington is a fish out of water in the dust of Lake Perkolilli.

The remote-control submarine pilot from Perth has spent the past year rebuilding a 1930 Model A Ford with his children.

“My 13-year-old twins got interested in it,” he said.

“We thought it would be a good thing as a family together; get them off social media [and] all the online bullying and everything.

“We sat down in the shed, put the radio on and we built a car together.Matt Harrington and his son Tom, 13, with the car they built together.(ABC Goldfields: Jarrod Lucas)none

“We bought it as a rolling chassis and then with the help of Tom and his twin sister Sarah we’ve put the engine together, got parts from all around Australia, and now we’re competing.”

The vintage car hit a top speed of 82kph on one of its early runs around the 3km track. Other drivers were clocked well above 160kph.

“That probably doesn’t sound fast but out there it’s so scary,” Mr Harrington said.John Lakeland behind the wheel of a 1938 Triumph sedan that he has converted into a sports car body.(ABC Goldfields: Jarrod Lucas)none

Car body made from oil drums

While most of the cars at the event have seen better years, they were built to last.

Vintage car collector John Lakeland is effectively running two cars in one.

He purchased a 1938 Triumph dolomite sedan seven years ago and combined it with the body of a pre-war sports car that had been parked in a friend’s shed for decades.

Even among such an impressive field of vintage cars, the rustic body of the Triumph stands out due to the fact it is built from old oil drums.

“We’ve gone to great pains to make it using old worn-out parts from that era. So the car basically looks like it has just come out of a barn,” Mr Lakeland said.John Lakeland, of Melbourne, has been racing a 1938 Triumph at the Red Dust Revival.  (ABC Goldfields: Jarrod Lucas)none

“The car still runs well. It’s done 650,000 miles (1 million kilometres) when I bought it and we’re probably up to 670,000 miles (1.1 millions kilometres) now and still going strong.”

As a member of the UK-based Pre-1940 Triumph Motor Club, Mr Lakeland has owned more than 30 Triumphs in his lifetime.

His present collection stands at six.

“I currently have more pre-war Triumphs than anyone in the world,” he said.

“They are absolutely magnificent cars that are polished to the Nth degree, but this car [the 1938 Triumph] gets more attention than the polished cars do.The hard claypan surface at Lake Perkolilli is one of Australia’s oldest race tracks.  (ABC Goldfields: Jarrod Lucas)none

“If I drive to an event or a service station, people are drooling over it and talking about it.

“Whereas if I drive the shiny one, they like it but they don’t pay as much attention as they do to this one, which looks like it’s been knocked around.”

Embracing the 1920s theme

While most spectators’ eyes are glued to the track, not everyone comes for the racing, but rather to relive the fashion of a bygone era.

One group of four women was spotted walking their dogs in 1920s-themed clothing, as they headed for the trackside tent to sip on champagne.Heather Mettam (from left), Ray Yates, Erna Gazeley and Jenny Fuller embraced the event by dressing in 1920s fashion.(ABC Goldfields: Jarrod Lucas)none

“I don’t think we’ve seen a race yet,” Jenny Fuller joked.

“Definitely Great Gatsby — that’s the theme,” Erna Gazeley said of the group’s outfits.

“I think we’ve all watched Downtown Abby a bit too which helped,” Ray Yates said.

It’s proof that the 1920s has indeed been revived on the WA Goldfields.

#AceNewsDesk report ………..Published: Sept.24: 2022:

Editor says …Sterling Publishing & Media Service Agency is not responsible for the content of external site or from any reports, posts or links, and can also be found here on Telegram: https://t.me/acenewsdaily and all wordpress and live posts and links here: https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

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World History & Research Reports

#OTD 1922: Ex-Kaiser to Marry Princess Hermineof Schönaich-Caroiath née Princess Ruess

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#AceHistoryDesk – Wilhelm II, who abdicated as emperor of Germany in the midst of defeat in World War I, had become a widower in 1921.

Sept. 20, 2022, 8:12 a.m. ET: By The International Herald Tribune

International Herald Tribune

DOORN, Tuesday. — The Kaiser has officially contracted an engagement of marriage with Princess Hermine of Schönaich-Caroiath née Princess Ruess.

The first official news of the former Kaiser’s engagement reached Paris yesterday in the above telegram to The New York Herald direct from Doorn. Princess Hermine, younger daughter of the late reigning Prince Heinrich XXII of the elder line of the House of Ruess, married Prince Johann, a cadet of the Prussian princely family of Carolath-Beuthen in 1907, and became a widow in 1920. She has three sons and two daughters.

According to a message from Berlin, the marriage will probably take place in November. The ex-Kaiser originally intended to announce his engagement towards the end of October, but changed his mind and made the present announcement owing to information published in America. 

Princess Hermine visited the ex-Kaiser at Doorn last spring and stayed about a week at the castle. Since then she has been in constant correspondence with him. The marriage project has encountered strong opposition from members of the Hohenzollern family and in Monarchist circles of Germany. A deputation, headed by Herr von Oldenburg-Januscha, even went to Doorn to press objections, but met with a warm reply from the former monarch.

The “Deutsche Tages Zeitung” indicates that the news of the engagement made a disagreeable impression on the ex-Kaiser’s sons, but that the unpleasantness has been glossed over, and they will be represented at the wedding by the former Crown Prince.

— The New York Herald, European Edition, Sept. 20, 1922.

#AceNewsDesk report ………..Published: Sept.20: 2022:

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Ace Daily News

HISTORY ISRAEL: ‘Extremely rare’ Rameses II-era burial cave found at beach

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#AceHistoryDesk – A mechanical digger has uncovered a burial cave from the time of ancient Egyptian Pharaoh Rameses II at an Israeli beach.

a person reaches the bottom of a ladder into the cave, with large pots in the foreground
The cave was filled with bowls, chalices and cooking pots to accompany the dead to the afterlife. (AFP: Emil Aladjem/Israeli Antiquities Authority)none

The square4, the artificial cave was found last week at Palmahim National Park when the digger hit its roof.

In a video released by the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA), archaeologists shine flashlights on pottery that dates back to the reign of the ancient Egyptian king, who died in 1213 BC.

It showed bowls — some containing bones — chalices, cooking pots, storage jars, lamps and bronze arrow or spearheads.

The objects were burial offerings to accompany the dead on their journey to the afterlife, untouched since they were put there about 3,300 years ago.

At least one relatively intact skeleton was also found in two rectangular plots in the corner of the cave.

“The cave may furnish a complete picture of the Late Bronze Age funerary customs,” said Eli Yannai, an IAA Bronze Age expert.

He said it was an “extremely rare … once-in-a-lifetime discovery”.

The provenance of the vessels — from Cyprus, Lebanon, northern Syria, Gaza and Jaffa — showe “lively trading activity that took place along the coast”, Dr Yannai said.

Rameses II controlled Canaan, a territory encompassing modern-day Israel and the Palestinian territories.

Another IAA archaeologist, David Gelman, said the people buried there may have been warriors. The contents are believed to be evidence of “lively trading activity”.(AFP: Emil Aladjem/Israeli Antiquities Authority)none

“The fact that these people were buried along with weapons, including entire arrows, shows that these people might have been warriors, perhaps they were guards on ships — which may have been the reason they were able to obtain vessels from all around the area,” he said.

“Burial caves are rare as it is, and finding one that hasn’t been touched since it was first used 3,300 years ago is something you rarely ever find.

“It feels like something out of an Indiana Jones movie: just going into the ground and everything is just laying there as it was initially — intact pottery vessels, weapons, vessels made out of bronze, burials just as they were.”

The cave has been resealed and is under guard while archaeologists develop a plan to excavate it, the IAA said.

It said “a few items” had been looted between its discovery and when it was closed.

AFP

#AceNewsDesk report ………..Published: Sept.19: 2022:

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Australian History

AUSTRALIA HISTORY: Black & White Mugshots of Criminal Underworld in 1920’s

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#AceHistoryDesk – Criminal underworld of 1920s New South Wales captured in an exhibition of rare mugshots………” They are unlike any mugshots you see anywhere else in the world – and we have looked.”

Side by side 1929 black and white mug shots of Arthur Caddy. Close up of Arthur's face and Arthur with hat, leaning on chair.
Arthur Caddy suspect photograph from 1929. Crime unknown.(Supplied: NSW Police Forensic Photography Archive, Sydney Living Museums)none

Sydney Living Museums curator Nerida Campbell says mugshots reproduced from glass negatives for the travelling exhibition Underworld: Mugshots from the Roaring Twenties are candid and compelling.

Side by side 1928 black and white mug shots of May Smith. Close up of May's face and May, with hat, leaning on a chair.
“Botany” May Smith, photographed in 1928, was suspected of supplying cocaine.(Supplied: NSW Police Forensic Photography Archive, Sydney Living Museums)none

More than 100 mugshots are included in the exhibition at the Albury Library Museum in regional New South Wales.

Ms Campbell said the photos were taken of suspects by NSW police between 1920 and 1930.

“There are about 130,000 negatives held at the Justice and Police Museum in Sydney and these are images taken by officers in the course of their inquiries,” she said.

“The images were taken so that police could show them to witnesses from a crime without making them aware that this person was in police custody.”

Ms Campbell said the suspects brought their own personality and character to the images.

“Some are staring right down the camera trying to intimidate the police officer taking the photo and some of the women are flirting,” she said.

“People are smoking cigarettes, holding handbags and holding conversations.”A 1930 photo of Guiseppe Mammone, who was suspected of murder and believed to be a Camorra mafia leader in Sydney.(Supplied: NSW Police Forensic Photography Archive, Sydney Living Museums)none

Ms Campbell said the 1920s were a time of great change in the criminal underworld in NSW.

“We begin to see cocaine being sold and bought during that period,” she said.

“Before that there were not as many cars on the roads, but in the 1920s we see the rise of the ‘teenage joy-rider’ — young men who just couldn’t resist the lure of those shiny fast cars.

“They would steal them, but many of them hadn’t driven a car — they hadn’t even seen their parents drive a car.

“You can imagine the kinds of mayhem we were seeing on the streets of towns and in cities in that period.”Gladys Lowe in 1928. Ms Lowe was suspected of opium possession.(Supplied: NSW Police Forensic Photography Archive, Sydney Living Museums)none

Mafia bosses to petty crims all feature in the mugshots.

“In the images you will see everything from those stone-cold gangsters … through to teenagers who made one dumb mistake and ended up in police custody.”Edna May Lindsay in 1929. Ms Lindsay stole a cheque from her employer. She and her boyfriend forged the signature with the aim of cashing it.(Supplied: NSW Police Forensic Photography Archive, Sydney Living Museums)none

Ms Campbell said some stories behind the images were a mystery, but many were known.

“There is one picture that I find compelling — she is a 19-year-old named Edna Lindsay, dressed as a beautiful flapper, and you can see the tears in her eyes.

“She had been led astray by her boyfriend and had stolen a cheque from her employer and got caught.

“When you look at that image you can see the dark circles under her eyes and the tears making her eyes glisten, you just don’t see that in modern mugshots to that degree.”Charles Simmons, alias George Moody, in 1920. He was suspected of a break, enter and steal.(Supplied: NSW Police Forensic Photography Archive, Sydney Living Museums)none

Ms Campbell said a 1920s police photographer would have needed a good relationship with the person being photographed, as they had to maintain a pose for a few seconds for a clear image to be captured.

“He had to be able to get them to go along with what he needed,” she said.

She said the 1920s NSW police officer who took the mugshots had remarkable photographic skills.

“We believe the police photographer was George Howard,” Ms Campbell said.

“He would have to deal with natural light,  glass-plate negatives and processing them.

“It was a very different skill to today.”

Underworld: Mugshots from the Roaring Twenties is on at the Albury Library Museum until October 30.

Thanks to ABC News

#AceNewsDesk report ………..Published: Sept.17: 2022:

Editor says …Sterling Publishing & Media Service Agency is not responsible for the content of external site or from any reports, posts or links, and can also be found here on Telegram: https://t.me/acenewsdaily and all wordpress and live posts and links here: https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com