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FEATURED AUSTRALIA: Labour says it punishes indigenous people as Cashless debit card users voice anger, apprehension about its looming end

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#AceNewsRoom With ‘Kindness & Wisdom’ Sept, 25, 2022 @acenewsservices

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#AceNewsDesk – Once a Kimberley stockman, Kenneth Paul Green now lives on a disability pension — the product of a chronic back injury — in a home on Kununurra’s fringe.

A woman puts a cashless debit card in a brown wallet
Labor argues that the card unfairly targets and punishes Indigenous people in remote areas.(ABC News: Michael Franchi)none

It is a place where the boab trees shine silver in the evening and the red cliffs glow: On his porch, he recalls when the cashless debit card was introduced to his remote West Australian town in 2016.

He felt like he never had a say.

“Why the hell do they do everything behind our back instead of talking the proper way to us,” Mr Green asked.

Now, he is furious the government is scrapping it, six years later, again without his choice.

“They put us on without permission, and now they’re gonna take us off, again without permission from us. How does that work?” he said.

An Aboriginal man sits on a couch on his veranda
Kenneth Paul Green wants to stay on the cashless debit card.(ABC News: Michael Franchi)none

As Labor moves to axe the cashless card, there is apprehension in northern Australia about life after the controversial form of compulsory income management.

The scheme quarantines 80 per cent of people’s welfare pay onto the card which can’t be used for alcohol, gambling or cash withdrawals.

More than 17,000 people in Western Australia, Queensland, South Australia and the Northern Territory use the card – and once it’s gone, Labor says income management will be made voluntary in all of those sites, except the NT and parts of Far North Queensland.

In those areas, a “new enhanced” income management card will be rolled out next year.

Mixed feelings on card’s demise

In Kununurra, views of those on the cashless debit card are nuanced and varied.

Some are glad to see it go, while others fear its removal could cause mayhem in an area that has long grappled with domestic violence and social dysfunction.

For Mr Green, he said he eventually appreciated the card, as it helped make sure he always had rent money, and enough funds to see his kids through school.

“To me it was a lifesaver … it controls my spending,” he said.

Labor went to the recent election pledging the card’s end, citing reports it stigmatised people and failed in its bid to break the welfare cycle and reduce social woes.

Legislation is before the Senate which, if it passes with amendments this week, will mean people can transition off the card from October.Mother of six Majella Roberts has mixed feelings about the Cashless Debit Card’s removal.(ABC News: Michael Franchi)none

Miriwoong woman Majella Roberts said the card helped her save money for her six children.

“On pay day you save it for a couple of days … without people asking for it,” she said.

“Use it in the shops, clothing shops, even for cabs as well.”

Now, however, she is happy it is being scrapped, because she is sick of struggling to find cash when she needs it.

“Some shops, like the garage, they don’t use those cards. You have to have cash,” she said.Senior Miriwoong man Ben Ward says people should have a choice about whether they use the Cashless Debit Card.(ABC News: Michael Franchi)none

About 30 kilometres away in Cockatoo Springs community, elder Ben Ward said the card should go, and agreed with the move towards a voluntary system.

“It’s not giving us our freedom and self-determination,” the senior Miriwoong man said.

“If we don’t have the choice then why the hell are we here?”

Under Labor’s new voluntary system, the government said those who choose to be on income management will have 50 per cent of their income quarantined, as opposed to 80.

Fears of a ‘policy vacuum’

Ian Trust fears removal of the Cashless Debit Card could cause chaos in his community. (ABC News: Michael Franchi)none

Ian Trust is one of the key Indigenous advocates for the card in the East Kimberley.

The executive chair of the not-for-profit Wunan Foundation said he was concerned removing the income management scheme could create a “policy vacuum”.

He also fears the extra cash on the streets would lead to a spike in alcohol-related harm.

“I think it could be chaos,” Mr Trust said.

“I mean, how much consultation has there been with the state? Has there been an increase in the police force? Has there been an increase in St John WA ambulance services?”

The Albanese Government has said that it would be committing more than $65 million in “additional alcohol and other drugs treatment services and support” and “community-led” initiatives to get people off welfare in sites where the card is ending.

Mr Trust, a Gija man, said Labor needed to address the factors behind generational welfare dependency, rather than simply adding or removing systems like the card.

“I think the card wasn’t perfect … I don’t think there is anything that is perfect,” Mr Trust said.

“[But] I think it had enough positive attributes that we could have built on it, and taken it to the next stage.”

He said the card’s removal was proof that short-term fixes were not the answer, and longer-term policy changes needed to be explored.

“Neglected children, domestic violence, youth suicides … it’s been a mounting crisis for a long time, and we’re going to have to take this seriously,” he said.

Department of Social Services statistics show the total number of people on welfare in remote and very remote Australia has risen by more than 15,000 people since 2012, from around 98,500 to 114,229 in 2022.

In the Kimberley, authorities have continued to grapple with high crime rates and ongoing social disadvantage since the card was implemented.

The Department of Social Services said it would also provide “additional social supports as required in response to the need of the individual CDC communities”.Kununurra grapples with high rates of crime, domestic violence and poverty.(ABC News: Michael Franchi)none

More changes to come

Labor flagged yesterday that it “remains committed to making income management voluntary over the long-term” for the thousands who will remain on the scheme after the end of the cashless card.

Of those, more than 20,000 people are in the Northern Territory, on the older NT Intervention-era income management scheme called the Basics Card.

Now, that card will be superseded by newer card technology, which Labor said would enable users to shop online and “have access to more merchants” than currently available, but still quarantine half of their welfare money.Malati Yunupingu went on the Basics Card after cancer made him too sick to work.(ABC News: Pete Garnish)none

NT man Malati Yunupingu — a resident of Gunyangara community in East Arnhem Land — went on the basics card after cancer made him too sick to work.

The Gumatj clan elder said the card helped him save money for food, and fears if it was ever removed completely, vulnerable children in his community would go hungry.

“It would make Yolngu people starve,” Mr Yunupingu said.

“We are living in a different world now. Mother and father are playing cards, on drugs, instead of thinking about the kids. That’s the saddest part of it.”Valerie Dhamarrandji says welfare recipients should be given the right to choose. (ABC News: Pete Garnish)none

Valerie Dhamarrandji, a part-time teacher’s assistant, said if the card became voluntary she would continue to use it — but also agreed that people should be given the right to choose.

“It’s not fair. It’s like some form of racism,” she said.

“We Australians should be equal in everything.”

The cashless card legislation is due to return to parliament tomorrow.

#AceNewsDesk report ………..Published: Sept.25: 2022:

Editor says …Sterling Publishing & Media Service Agency is not responsible for the content of external site or from any reports, posts or links, and can also be found here on Telegram: https://t.me/acenewsdaily and all wordpress and live posts and links here: https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

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FEATURED AUSTRALIA: Indigenous activists condemn New York Times obituary of Uncle Jack Charles as offensive

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#AceNewsRoom With ‘Kindness & Wisdom’ Sept, 24, 2022 @acenewsservices

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#AceNewsDesk – Ronnie Gorrie, a Gunai/Kurnai woman from Victoria and a former Queensland police officer, has condemned the New York Times over its obituary of Uncle Jack Charles.

Jack Charles, wearing a red shirt and black vest, smiles before a dark black background.
Actor and activist Uncle Jack Charles died earlier this month.(ABC RN — Jeremy Story Carter)none

Ms Gorrie, who knew celebrated actor and activist Uncle Jack personally, described the obituary as insensitive and culturally inappropriate.

NOTE: This story uses Uncle Jack Charles’s name and image with the permission of his family.

“Uncle Jack Charles was a well-respected Elder in our community,” Ms Gorrie said.

“His death has rocked Australia and certainly Victoria, so I do appreciate the untimely death of him has reached the shores of New York.

“I did find the initial story, and the headline quite atrocious and upsetting.”

Uncle Jack, a Boon Wurrung, Dja Dja Wurrung, Woiwurrung and Yorta Yorta man, died peacefully at the age of 79 on September 13 after suffering a stroke.

The lede paragraph of the New York Times story initially read:

MELBOURNE, Australia — Jack Charles, one of Australia’s leading Indigenous actors, who has been called the “grandfather of Aboriginal theatre” but whose heroin addiction and penchant for burglary landed him in and out of jail throughout his life, died on September 13 in Melbourne. He was 79.

It was updated to read:

MELBOURNE, Australia — Jack Charles, one of Australia’s leading Indigenous actors and activists, who has been called the “grandfather of Aboriginal theatre” and who spent years in prison for burglaries that he saw as acts of reparations, died on September 13 in Melbourne. He was 79.

” Culturally, it’s quite disrespectful to speak ill of our dead,” Ms Gorrie said.

“So, it’s really triggering for us mob, for Blackfellas to see this written about him. And to portray him for his past is quite disgusting.

“I do feel for the family, who would have been definitely traumatised for what they read. It’s very upsetting.”

Ms Gorrie said the article received backlash on Twitter before it was amended.

The New York Times also used the term “so-called” when referring to the Stolen Generations. The phrase has since been removed.

“Firstly, if you’re going to write about an Aboriginal person that is a Stolen Generation survivor, know the history,” Ms Gorrie said.

“Don’t refer to it as ‘so-called’ as if you’re implying that it never happened.

“Right now, the Victorian government are compensating survivors and victims of the Stolen Generation. My grandmother was stolen at the age of eight years old.

“My father was stolen from her the minute she gave birth to him, so I find that quite offensive and quite upsetting as well.”Uncle Jack Charles was a member of the Stolen Generations.(ABC News: Danielle Bonica)none

The bureau chief for the New York Times in Australia, Damien Cave, yesterday tweeted about the edit and the deletion of an original tweet, which read:

The ABC contacted the New York Times for further comment and was told they didn’t have anything to add at this point.

Talk of criminal past a sore point 

Ms Gorrie spent a decade from 2002 to 2012 as a officer for Queensland police, writing about her experiences in Black and Blue: a Memoir of Racism and Resilience.

She said racial profiling of Indigenous people by police was an epidemic.

“White Australia has this assumption that all black men are violent and criminal, when they’re not,” she said.

“I’ve raised an amazing Aboriginal man. My father’s an incredible Aboriginal man. And Uncle Jack was an incredible Aboriginal man.

“I just know from my time in the police how cops racially profile.

“If you’re an Aboriginal person, you will be intercepted, you will be detained, you will be searched if you’re deemed to be a smart-arse.

“They will make it difficult, and they’ll find charges, and they’ll load them up on you.”

Jeffery Amatto is a proud Wiradjuri man from Wellington NSW and the founder of More Cultural Rehabs Less Jails.Jeffery Amatto is the founder of More Cultural Rehabs Less Jails.(Facebook: Jeff Amatto “More Cultural Rehabs Less Jails”)none

He never met Uncle Jack, but had interacted with him on LinkedIn.

“He was a very strong advocate for our people and how broken the system really is,” Mr Amatto said.

“He was a very inspirational man and he definitely led the way for us younger generation to start stepping up and speaking our mind.”

Mr Amatto has spent time in the criminal justice system and said police were too quick to lock up Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

“If we want help with our trauma and our addictions and alcoholism and mental health, sometimes, we have to wait up to eight to nine weeks to get it and that’s not even guaranteeing a bed in a cultural-based rehab — where the magic happened for me,” he said.

Mr Amatto consults in communities that need treatment centres, helps roll out programs with youth and works with people who are coming out of custody.

Mr Amatto said jail was not the solution.

“We can’t get well in a jail cell. Don’t tell me prisons are rehabilitating our people, because it’s not,” he said.

“You’ve got to start having us around the table and having our input into the big decisions now if we want to close the gap.”

#AceNewsDesk report ………..Published: Sept.24: 2022:

Editor says …Sterling Publishing & Media Service Agency is not responsible for the content of external site or from any reports, posts or links, and can also be found here on Telegram: https://t.me/acenewsdaily and all wordpress and live posts and links here: https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

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FEATURED AUSTRALIA: Queen Elizabeth II Leaves Complex Legacy for Aboriginal Indigenous Citizens

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#AceNewsRoom With ‘Kindness & Wisdom’ Sept, 23, 2022 @acenewsservices

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#AceNewsDesk Proudly displayed in Narelda Jacobs’ childhood home in Australia was a photo of her father, Cedric, meeting Queen Elizabeth II.

By Tiffanie Turnbull
BBC News, Sydney

Cedric Jacobs receiving his MBE from the Queen
Cedric Jacobs received an MBE from the Queen in 1981 for his service to Indigenous Australians

As a kid, I grew up looking at her in an aspirational way and thinking: ‘Gosh, that’s the Queen! And that’s my dad receiving an [MBE] order from the Queen!'” the Aboriginal Australian television presenter says.

“She’s someone that I always looked up to.”

But as Ms Jacobs grew older, the meaning of the photo shifted.

When she looks at it now, she sees a sovereign standing in front of a man who dedicated his life to having the sovereignty of his own people recognised.

“And he died waiting for that recognition,” the Whadjuk Noongar woman tells the BBC.

Many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have spoken of complicated emotions after the Queen’s death.

The oldest continuing cultures on Earth, they suffered greatly from colonialism. The arrival of Captain James Cook in 1770 set off events that dispossessed Indigenous Australians of their land. Massacres, profound cultural disruption, and intergenerational trauma followed.

When Queen Elizabeth II first visited Australia in 1954, First Nations people were not counted as part of the population, and children were still being forcibly removed from their families to be assimilated into white households. In some parts of her tour, Aboriginal Australians were actively hidden from view.

Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip wave to the crowd on their visit to Australia in 1954
An estimated 70% of Australia’s population saw the Queen on her first visit

Much has changed since, but Indigenous Australians remain disproportionately worse off in terms of health, education and other measures compared to non-Indigenous Australians.

“We’re still not doing as well… and that’s because of colonial rule,” Wiradjuri academic Sandy O’Sullivan says.

Mixed feelings

As a result Australia has struggled with the question of how to celebrate her life while acknowledging some of the country’s darkest chapters.

A decision to lower the Aboriginal flag to half-mast in her honour – in line with other official flags – drew some criticism, as did the decision to suspend parliament for a fortnight. A promise to rename a Melbourne hospital from an Aboriginal word, Maroondah, to Queen Elizabeth II Hospital has been attacked as “tone deaf”.

Controversially, the Australian Football League Women’s decided against mandating a minute’s silence for the Queen last week because it was Indigenous Round. But the National Rugby League fined and suspended an Indigenous player after she wrote an offensive post about the Queen that some defended as freedom of speech.

For the University of Canberra Chancellor and Aboriginal elder Tom Calma, the Queen led a life of service “with a whole lot of dignity and humanity”.

“She inherited, at a very young age, a whole lot of global challenges. We’ve seen a lot of change and she’s been at the helm of that,” says Prof Calma, a Kungarakan and Iwaidja man.

She seemed sympathetic, he says, to the desires of First Nations people – such as in 2000 when she called for the government to “ensure prosperity touches all Australians”, pointing out many Indigenous people felt “left behind”.

But some say the Queen’s legacy in Australia is impossible to separate from the invasion and colonisation of the country.

Among them is Greens Senator Lidia Thorpe, who referred to the Queen as a coloniser while taking her oath in parliament earlier this year. 

Indigenous people never ceded their sovereignty, the Djabwurrung Gunnai Gunditjmara woman wrote in the Guardian Australia last week. 

“The institutions that British colonisation brought here, from the education that erases us to the prisons that kill us, are designed to destroy the oldest living culture in the world,” wrote Ms Thorpe.

‘ That’s the legacy of the Crown in this country.”

For others, there is criticism of what the Queen herself didn’t do. Many Indigenous Australians made appeals to her for greater support during her reign. 

Among them was Ms Jacobs’ father, an Anglican reverend and one-time National Aboriginal Conference chair. Though he was always “very fond” of the Queen, Cedric Jacobs had spoken to her about his people’s desire for a treaty.

“Could there have been something that she could have done?” Ms Jacobs asks.

Narelda and Cedric Jacobs
Narelda Jacobs with her father, Cedric

Prof O’Sullivan says: “I don’t have a lot of time for people who want to celebrate the idea of somebody passing away.”

But it’s not fair to paint the Queen as simply a “kindly grandmother” given she was so influential and had “enormous wealth”, the academic adds. 

She used that power to be an “incredibly eloquent” advocate for some causes, Prof O’Sullivan says. “[But] she certainly didn’t do anything to make our lives better.”

Prof Calma argues the Queen inherited colonial tensions she had no part in creating.

“There’s always an argument that more could have happened, but that’s not always in the hands of the monarch,” he says.

“We can’t continually blame the Crown, when we’ve had our own constitution since 1901. It is the Australian government who has to step up.”

‘An opportunity’

Some argue an Australia that recognises the harm colonisation has done to First Nations people, cannot remain subject to a British monarch.

But a referendum on a republic looks at least three years away. Prime Minister Anthony Albanese has committed to first holding a referendum on recognising Indigenous people in Australia’s constitution and giving them a Voice to Parliament – a new advisory body.

And even if Australia becomes a republic it may not leave the Commonwealth, Prof Calma says.

Some urge the monarchy to embrace a new era.

“This is an opportunity for a clean slate,” Prof O’Sullivan says. “I have a lot of a lot of hope.”

Tom Calma pictured with King Charles
Tom Calma, left, pictured with King Charles on one of his visits to Australia

Some Indigenous Australians want King Charles III to make an apology for the damage done by colonialism – like that offered to New Zealand’s Māori in 1995.

There are also calls for reparations – financial compensation, the return of land and artefacts, and the repatriation of ancestral remains located in British museums.

The King could also consider lending his support to the campaign for the Voice to Parliament, some say.

All the BBC spoke to said they wanted the King to meet with First Nations people, and to listen.

“It is really frustrating. These are the same conversations that our leaders would have had with his mum,” Ms Jacobs said.

“But I don’t want anybody else to die waiting to have their sovereignty as a First Nations person recognised.”

#AceNewsDesk report ………..Published: Sept.23: 2022:

Editor says …Sterling Publishing & Media Service Agency is not responsible for the content of external site or from any reports, posts or links, and can also be found here on Telegram: https://t.me/acenewsdaily and all wordpress and live posts and links here: https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

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AUSTRALIA COURT REPORT: Tiwi Islands traditional owners win court challenge against gas company Santos’ massive Barossa offshore project

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#AceNewsDesk – Tiwi Islands traditional owners have won a federal court challenge against Santos’ $4.7 billion Barossa gas project in the Timor Sea north of Darwin.

A man stands on a beach looking past the camera, his hands on his hips and storm clouds gathering behind him.
Dennis Tipakalippa says he was not consulted about Santos’ Barossa project, which will run a gas pipeline through his family’s sea country.(Supplied: Rebecca Parker)none

Environmental lawyers representing Munupi clan elder Dennis Tipakalippa argued the group was not properly consulted before approval for the project was granted by the federal regulator in February.

After a five day hearing, including a special on-country session where traditional songs and dances were performed as evidence in the case, federal court justice Mordecai Bromberg ruled that the project’s approval was invalid.

The ruling means the gas giant has to maintain a pause on work on the project that began after the court challenge was filed.

The Environment Defenders Office had argued the approval granted by the National Offshore Petroleum and Safety Environmental Management Authority (NOPSEMA) was unlawful.

A gas platform in the Timor Sea.
Santos has invested billions into the Barossa gas field in the Timor Sea.(Supplied: ConocoPhillips)none

Lawyers for Mr Tipakalippa said Santos had not consulted with the Munupi clan and gave the Tiwi Land Council (TLC) insufficient information about the project.

Elders including Mr Tipakalippa and sea rangers from the Tiwi Islands told the court of their concerns about the project’s possible impacts on cultural and spiritual values as well as food sources and the marine environment.Members of the Munupi clan attended a court hearing on the Tiwi Islands earlier this year.(ABC News: Tristan Hooft)none

The court ruled the regulator failed to assess whether the company’s approval application showed it had consulted with all relevant parties, as required by law.

It also said NOPSEMA did not consider some material in the application that it was required to assess.

‘A huge victory’

Environment Defenders Office Special Counsel Alina Leikin said the ruling was a “huge victory for the Munupi Clan and a testament to their strength and dedication in the face of one of the biggest mining companies in the country”.

“It will have national and global implications for consultation with First Nations peoples on mining projects,” she said. 

“Today’s decision puts oil and gas companies on notice.

“It sets a new standard about the consultation that companies are required to conduct with First Nations peoples before drilling in the sea.”Santos says the decision is damaging for investor confidence in Australia.(Supplied: Santos Limited)none

Senior Munupi traditional owner and lead plaintiff Dennis Tipakalippa told the ABC he was “the happiest man alive”.

“I had to stand up, especially with the drilling that was going to go ahead,” he said. 

“I’m just doing it for my ancestors, and I’m doing it for my future generations, and with this result today, I’m very happy.”

Mr Tipakalippa said he would host a big community celebration tonight, featuring a traditional ceremony and dance.Dennis Tipakalippa says he is “over the moon”.(Supplied: Environment Centre NT)none

Santos ‘disappointed’, calls for full court review

In a statement, Santos said the decision was disappointing and damaging for investor confidence in Australia.A special on-country session took place at Pitjimirra on the Tiwi Islands at the start of the hearing.(ABC News: Tristan Hooft)none

“As a result of the decision, the drilling activities will be suspended pending a favourable appeal outcome or the approval of a fresh Environment Plan,” the statement read.

“Given the significance of this decision to us, our international joint venture partners and customers, and the industry more broadly, we consider that it should be reviewed by the Full Federal Court on appeal.”

The company said it had engaged with the Tiwi Land Council and Northern Land Council about the proposed project, and that NOPSEMA “accepted our efforts to consult with Tiwi Islanders” when it accepted the environmental plan.

The statement said the project is currently 46 per cent complete and there is “headroom” in the cost contingencies for the project.

It finished with a warning to governments.

“Project approval uncertainty is a public policy issue that should be urgently addressed by Australian governments to reduce risk for trade and investment in projects around the country,” the statement said.

“Santos appreciates the strong support from our Japanese and Korean joint venture partners, who have, in good faith, and on the back of Australia’s historical reputation as a safe and stable investment destination, invested in this project.”

ABC NEWS

#AceNewsDesk report ………..Published: Sept.22: 2022:

Editor says …Sterling Publishing & Media Service Agency is not responsible for the content of external site or from any reports, posts or links, and can also be found here on Telegram: https://t.me/acenewsdaily and all wordpress and live posts and links here: https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

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FEATURED: AFL REPORT: Investigating Claims by Aboriginal Players at one of its most successful ‘ Football Clubs’ were bullied by senior coaching staff.

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#AceNewsDesk – Hawthorn Football Club hit by ‘harrowing’ racism, bullying claims

By Tiffanie Turnbull
BBC News, Sydney

An outside view of Hawthorn club headquarters
The Hawthorn Football Club have won 13 AFL premierships

Hawthorn Football Club players were reportedly isolated from family, told to leave their partners and one alleges he was ordered to end a pregnancy.

One of the coaches implicated has taken leave as the league investigates the “disturbing” claims.

They were uncovered by a review of the team’s treatment of Indigenous people.

The Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) published details of the confidential report on Wednesday, as the league prepares for the grand final on Saturday.

Brisbane Lion coach Chris Fagan – who was at the Hawks during the period in question – has announced he will take leave while the investigation takes place. Two other senior coaching staff mentioned in the ABC report are yet to respond.

ABC interviewed three unnamed players who were at the Melbourne club – also known as the Hawks – between 2005 and 2021. During that time, they say they were forced to choose between their careers and their families.

One said coaching staff had “demanded that I needed to get rid of my unborn child and my partner”.

“I was then manipulated and convinced to remove my SIM card from my phone so there was no further contact between my family and me. They told me I’d be living with one of the other coaches from that night onward,” he said.

His partner did not go through with an abortion and the couple reconciled within months. But when she became pregnant again soon after the birth of their first child, the woman told the ABC she felt she needed to end that pregnancy to avoid a repeat ordeal.

Another player told the ABC Hawthorn reacted similarly when they learned his partner was pregnant. He said he was forced to break up with her and cut off contact. She later miscarried.

A third player – who was from another state – told the investigation the club had actively tried to stop his young family from relocating to Melbourne to be with him.

All three couples spoke about their mental health struggles since the incidents.

Hawthorn said they received the report detailing the allegations two weeks ago, and they passed it on to Australian Football League (AFL) officials.

But AFL chief executive Gillon McLachlan has told media that the ABC investigation contained previously unknown details, adding that it made for “a challenging, harrowing and disturbing read”.

“It’s hard to find more serious allegations,” he said.

An independent panel, to be led by an eminent lawyer, will be appointed to investigate them, he said.

Hawthorn chief executive Justin Reeves on Wednesday said the allegations were “heartbreaking”, but insisted current players feel “culturally safe”.

“But like so many institutions, I think we have to face our history and our past,” he added.

Asked if the club had a cultural problem, he responded: “I think Australia has a culture problem.”

Several star players from multiple AFL teams have complained of racist abuse from stadium crowds and poor support from club officials in recent years.

Indigenous AFL legend Adam Goodes says years of abuse from rival fans left him “heartbroken” and led to him retiring in 2015.

And a review into a separate Melbourne club – Collingwood – last year found it was guilty of “systemic racism”.

Adam Goodes: Rival fans’ racism made me quit AFL

#AceNewsDesk report ………..Published: Sept.21: 2022:

Editor says …Sterling Publishing & Media Service Agency is not responsible for the content of external site or from any reports, posts or links, and can also be found here on Telegram: https://t.me/acenewsdaily and all wordpress and live posts and links here: https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

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FEATURED AUSTRALIA ABORIGINAL HERITAGE LAWS: Minister appoints independent consultant to investigate millennia-old rock art on WA’s Burrup Peninsula.

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#AceNewsDesk – Last month, Federal Environment Minister Tanya Plibersek denied an emergency stop work application — lodged as a ‘section 9’ under federal Aboriginal heritage laws — by a group of traditional owners to prevent the Perdaman plant relocating sacred rock art.

Raelene Cooper waves her hands in the air while standing on the rocks in the Burrup Peninsula.
Raelene Cooper on country on the Burrup Peninsula in Western Australia.(ABC News: Brendan Esposito)none

One of Australia’s most productive industrial areas will be under the spotlight, after the federal government appointed an independent reporter to look into claims significant Aboriginal sites are being threatened by continued development.

The Burrup Peninsula’s growing industrial zone, in the WA’s Pilbara region, is the site of the country’s largest liquefied natural gas producer, Woodside, the Yara Pilbara fertiliser plant, and will soon be home to the Perdaman fertiliser plant.

But the government has now progressed a different application, commonly referred to as a ‘section 10’, to appoint a qualified person to look into claims rock art in the area is at risk, and whether it is worthy of a ministerial declaration to protect it.

Rock art on the Burrup Peninsula, depicting a turtle.
Murujuga is home to one of the world’s most significant collections of petroglyphs.(ABC News: Brendan Esposito)none

Both applications were lodged by a group of traditional owners known as Save our Songlines, in accordance with the Aboriginal Torres Strait Islander Heritage Protection Act 1984 (ATSHIP Act).

“We’re kind of hopeful and being positive,” Save our Songlines leader, Mardudunera woman Raelene Cooper said.

“However, we do understand this is going to be a long, drawn out process … and we still have those concerns in relation to our rock art that’s going to be … moved.”

The rock art of Murujuga is comprised of more than a million petroglyphs, spread over 37,000 hectares.

Traditional owners say it is a place where everything is connected, and that the moving of rock carvings will damage their spiritual connection to the sites which tell the stories of their ancestors.

A spokesperson for Environment and Water Minister Tanya Plibersek said it was “standard” to appoint an independent consultant following a section 10 application.

“The consultant will take as long as is needed to prepare the report. There is no statutory time frame,” the spokesperson said in a statement.

‘Our preference is the rock art remain in situ’

While the reporter may take months to investigate whether industry poses a threat to the millennia-old rock art, Perdaman has already received all the necessary state approvals to begin work on the plant and can begin immediately.

Ms Cooper is a former member of the area’s official Indigenous representative body, the Murujuga Aboriginal Corporation (MAC).

MAC does not have the authority to approve or reject development in the Burrup’s industrial zone, but was consulted by Perdaman about its plans to move the rock art.

“The Circle of Elders have made it clear on numerous occasions that their preference is for rock art to remain in situ and undisturbed,” MAC’s CEO Peter Jeffries previously told the government in a letter.

“However, [Perdaman] has advised on numerous occasions that this was not possible and Circle of Elders have made their recommendation to relocate these sites on that basis.”The Save our Songlines section 10 application says the land, sky, sea, plants, animals, the Lore and the spiritual world are connected at Murujuga.(ABC News: Brendan Esposito)none

Responding to the ABC about the appointment of an independent reporter, Mr Jeffries said MAC had been contacted by the consultant and would be speaking with them as part of the process.

“MAC has a vested interest in the legislative protection of Murujuga and we hope that the current reporting process will help to clarify and strengthen some of the heritage protections we rely upon,” Mr Jeffries said in a statement.

The Save our Songlines section 10 application does not take issue solely with the Perdaman plant.

The group has also expressed a number of other concerns, including the impact on the rock art of pollution from increasing industry on the Burrup Peninsula issues with access to sacred sites, as well as “visual desecration” caused by a proposed bank of solar panels connected to the Yara Pilbara Hydrogen Plant, close to where rangers conduct cultural tours.

A spokesperson for Woodside, which has been operating in the area for more than 40 years, said the company had undertaken extensive archaeological and ethnographic surveys with traditional owners.Woodside says it has engaged Traditional Owners and Heritage experts to ensure its projects are not impacting on rock art.(ABC News: Brendan Esposito)none

The company said peer-reviewed research had not revealed any impact on the rock art from emissions from local gas production.

But existing research has been questioned, and the Western Australian government has established a more extensive monitoring program to assess whether pollution is degrading the ancient petroglyphs in the area.

Woodside said it supported this program.

‘You can count them on one hand’

Save our Songlines remains optimistic the forthcoming report will save their sacred sites from damage as development expands on the peninsula, but history suggests the application may not lead to long term protections.Raelene Coopers, who leads Save our Songlines, says she is fighting for justice for her land and people.(ABC News: Brendan Esposito)none

According to a report by the Productivity Commission in 2020, only seven out of 500 applications resulted in long-term declarations since the commencement of the Act in 1984.

Last year, Traditional Owners in New South Wales successfully challenged the construction of a go kart track on culturally significant grounds in Bathurst.

Native title lawyer Greg McIntyre SC — who was involved in the landmark Mabo native title case — explained it’s common for the minister to appoint a reporter to investigate, but that it rarely leads to a protective order.

“There’s been historical criticism of this legislation as not being effective because so few applications are actually granted.”

After the destruction of the Juukan Gorge rock shelters by Rio Tinto in 2020, a parliamentary inquiry into the disaster recommended an urgent and thorough review of the ATSHIP Act, to bring it in line with current international human rights standards which include free, prior and informed consent.

Minister for Indigenous Australians Linda Burney, told the ABC in July the Labor government was committed to developing a stand-alone cultural heritage legislation, but a timeline is yet to be set.

Mr McIntyre said while current federal and state legislation is designed to avoid damage to Aboriginal heritage, it still puts “economic and resource industry interests ahead of the Aboriginal significance of the areas”. 

“There’s still not adequate comprehensive legislation or processes and a recognition of the importance to Australia’s heritage of protecting its First Nations people’s heritage,” said Mr McIntyre. 

“There is no legislation in Australia which requires the consent of First Nations people before heritage is damaged.”

Ms Cooper said she wanted to see the Burrup Peninsula represent a turning point for Indigenous Australians.Raelene Cooper had hoped the government would also approve her group’s section 9 application to put an emergency stop to work on the Perdaman fertiliser plant.(ABC News: Brendan Esposito)none

“It’s appalling that in this day and age, we’re still, as First Nations people, being told to sit in the back seat, and that ain’t me,” she said. 

“If there’s any advice for all of my countrymen all over this continent, [it’s that] we have a right and we have a story and we have a history here and our government needs to start acknowledging it.

“It’s about equality and quality of life for everybody.”

The ABC contacted Perdaman, Yara Industries and the Western Australian department of Water and Environmental regulation, but did not receive a response before deadline.

#AceNewsDesk report ………..Published: Sept.15: 2022:

Editor says …Sterling Publishing & Media Service Agency is not responsible for the content of external site or from any reports, posts or links, and can also be found here on Telegram: https://t.me/acenewsdaily and all wordpress and live posts and links here: https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

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Ace Breaking News

BREAKING AUSTRALIA: More than 362,000 hectares of historic land on QLD Cape York Peninsula has been handed back to Indigenous groups

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#AceBreakingNews – Historic land handover as 360,000 hectares returned to traditional owners

Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk clasps the hand of a man holding a framed document
Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk says the agreement marks a historic and emotional milestone.(ABC Far North: Brendan Mounter)none

The deal will see national park and Aboriginal freehold land — equivalent to 676,000 football fields — returned to three local Indigenous groups after decades of campaigning.

“Today is a very historic day, many, many years in the making,” Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said from the small coastal town of Injinoo. 

The large parcel of land includes the Jardine River National Park, Denham Group National Park, part of Heathlands Reserve and Jardine River Reserve, and two offshore islands.

The area will be jointly managed by the Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service and the Gudang Yadhaykenu, Atambaya and Angkamuthi (Seven Rivers) peoples.

A line of First Nations people holding framed documents
Traditional owners have waited generations to have their land returned.(ABC Far North: Brendan Mounter)none

“The journey for today has been a long struggle from way back when we were younger,” Angkamuthi woman Sandra Woosup said.

“It’s really a blessing for us today — to see this finally come to us, giving us our land back.

“It’s better our way than anyone else coming and telling us what to do on our country.”

As part of the deal, Jardine River National Park will be renamed Apudthama National Park, which means “together”. 

In total, the state government says it has now returned more 4.3 million hectares of land to traditional owners on Cape York. The parcel of land in Cape York takes in diverse landscapes and animal life.(ABC Far North: Brendan Mounter)none

Environment Minister Meaghan Scanlon said the latest agreement was the culmination of a complex land negotiation spanning many years.

“This program is fundamentally about land justice, about righting some of the wrongs of the past,” Ms Scanlon said.

“Our First Nations people were the traditional custodians of this land for thousands and thousands of years — they’ve cared for country and they rightfully are the best people to work with Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service to manage these really important ecosystems.”

Ms Scanlon said the area takes in diverse landscapes, including perched lakes, grasslands, open woodlands, cloud forests, wetlands and mangroves.

It also provides habitat for unique plants and animals like the cuscus, cassowary and the rare Jardine River turtle.Environment Minister Meaghan Scanlon says the land agreement is about “righting the wrongs” of the past.(ABC Far North: Brendan Mounter)none

Gudang Yadhaykenu man Nicholas Thompson Wymarra said the land handover would give traditional owners the chance to revive their Dreaming.

“Our identity and who we are has been lost for many decades due to the past dark history that has happened here throughout our Cape York region,” he said.

“There’s definitely going to be a brighter future for our kids, our grandkids, our great-great-grandkids.

“It’s such a wonderful feeling — I’m feeling on top of the world.”

#AceNewsDesk report ………..Published: Sept.08: 2022:

Editor says …Sterling Publishing & Media Service Agency is not responsible for the content of external site or from any reports, posts or links, and can also be found here on Telegram: https://t.me/acenewsdaily and all wordpress and live posts and links here: https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

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Ace Daily News

FEATURED: ‘The Man of the Hole’ dies in Brazil after decades of solitude away from civilization

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#AceNewsDesk – After living in total isolation for more than 25 years, the last remaining member of a Brazilian Indigenous tribe has died, officials say: The man, whose name was unknown, was the only inhabitant of Tanaru Indigenous Land, in the western Brazilian Amazon bordering Bolivia.

A man axing a tree in a Brazilian jungle
ABC NEWS REPORT: The rest of the man’s tribe had been reportedly massacred in a series of attacks from the 1970s onwards. (FUNAI)none

He was known by the nickname “Man of the Hole” for his practice of digging deep pits for hunting animals or his own shelter.

The man’s body was found inside his hammock in his hut a week ago, without signs of violence or struggle.

Over the decades, the man had resisted all outside attempts to contact him and shot arrows at those who came too close, though authorities continued to monitor him from afar and occasionally left supplies for him.

Brazil’s Indigenous affairs agency FUNAI said the man was the “only survivor of his community” and had lived in “voluntary isolation”.

In 2018, members of FUNAI filmed the man during a chance encounter in the jungle.

The footage showed him topless and swinging an axe-like tool at a tree.

The rest of the man’s tribe had been reportedly massacred in a series of attacks from the 1970s onwards by ranchers wanting to expand their land.

The Tanaru territory stands as a small island of forest in a sea of vast cattle ranches, in one of the most violent regions in Brazil.

“No outsider knew this man’s name, or even very much about his tribe – and with his death the genocide of his people is complete,” said Fiona Watson, the Research and Advocacy Director of Survival International, a group that advocates for the rights of Indigenous people around the world.

“He symbolised both the appalling violence and cruelty inflicted on Indigenous peoples worldwide in the name of colonisation and profit, but also their resistance.”The Brazilian Amazon has the largest number of people living in voluntary isolation.(Reuters:Bruno Kelly)none

The 8,000 hectares of Tanaru Indigenous Territory is one of seven territories in Brazil protected by land protection orders, which make it illegal for loggers and miners to enter tribal lands.

Facing pressure from agricultural and economic interests, the Brazilian government had campaigned to scrap the protections for Indigenous people. 

The Brazilian Amazon is home to the largest number of Indigenous people living in voluntary isolation.

#AceNewsDesk report ………..Published: Aug.31: 2022:

Editor says …Sterling Publishing & Media Service Agency is not responsible for the content of external site or from any reports, posts or links, and can also be found here on Telegram: https://t.me/acenewsdaily and all wordpress and live posts and links here: https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

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Ace Daily News

FEATURED AUSTRALIA FREEDOM DAY FESTIVAL: Toni Childs features in all-female line-up to remember women of Wave Hill walk-off

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#AceNewsDesk – They are fashionably late to their own show, leaving no time for a final run through: A dozen models painted up and dressed in couture race to the stage, file into line, and finally, as the dust settles on Gurindji Country, they nervously step onto stage to a crowd of applause.

A line of young and old models on a stage.
The Chidanpee Modelling agency provided an opportunity for women from Kalkarindji to participate for the first time. (ABC News: Roxanne Fitzgerald)none

Strutting across a makeshift runway was never a dream for Sheronica Snowy – she didn’t know it could be until the opportunity was right in front of her – plucked from the crowd in her home community of Yarralin.

“I feel really proud of myself, really excited, but also very nervous,” she said.

Their clothes tell the stories of their culture, sharing yarns thousands of years old – but on this night, in the tiny community of Kalkarindji, heaving with the footsteps of thousands of people – the show’s tenor runs deeper than sharing First Nations culture.

A young model with face paintings poses on  a stage.
First-time model Sheronica Snowy was part of a dozen models who took to the stage on Saturday night to showcase a collection of wearable art by NT female designers. (ABC News: Roxanne Fitzgerald)none

At the 56th anniversary of the Wave Hill walk-off — a seminal event that galvanised national change and paved the way for equal wages for Aboriginal workers, as well as a new land rights act – history was made again.

For the first time, women dominated the entertainment line-up at Freedom Day Festival on Saturday night, in a bid to put women back into the history of the Wave Hill story.

It is well known that in 1966 Vincent Lingiari led some 200 stockmen and their families off the Vestey Brothers’ Wave Hill pastoral station in protest of decades of exploitation, violence and unfair working conditions.

It led to one of the longest strikes in Australian history, and inspired one of the country’s most iconic songs, From Little Things Big Things Grow.

From the trailblazing activist Dexter Daniels, who travelled the country to spread the message of the strike, to former Prime Minister Gough Whitlam, who ceremonially returned a portion of Gurindji land to traditional owners in 1975, the history is dominated by men.

Play Video. Duration: 1 minute 5 seconds
Freedom Day Festival(ABC News: Roxanne Fitzgerald)none

Yet there is another part of the story that has been blotted out by time – the account of the women who were also paid rations to cook and clean, and made up a significant portion of the strikers.

“While it’s always important to acknowledge and honour Vincent Lingiari and all of the legendary men of the Wave Hill walk-off, we also wanted to use the festival’s Saturday program to show deep respect for the women of this powerful movement whose stories often go untold,” festival producer Susannah Tosh said.

Saturday night’s headliner, Pakana singer from Tasmania, Denni, said it was a “massive honour” to be playing on Gurindji country on a night that had a powerful message that struck a chord with her own history.

“My great-grandmother and my uncle were very heavily involved in land rights and land parcels being returned to our community,” she said.

Yet decades later the “struggle” to win back land continued.

“What we are doing here today, what the mob, the TOs, and locals are putting in to share [the untold story of women] is super important,” she said.

A young girl in a hat stands in the out back of the northern territory
Musician Denni says it is important to elevate the untold story of the Wave Hill women. (ABC News: Roxanne Fitzgerald)none

“The women in the walk-off were essentially the back bone … [it’s important to] commemorate and honour them and the hard-yards that they put in,” adding that parallels run in the music industry today.

“Women are very highly undervalued, so we will be singing up tonight, swishing the flies away and being very proud to be here.”

The all-women line-up also included Jem Cassar Daley, Toni Childs, Ripple Effect — an all-female rock band hailing from a remote Arnhem Land community.

Toni Childs sings on stage in a hat.
American singer songwriter Toni Childs says it was an honour to perform at Freedom Day Festival. (ABC News: Roxanne Fitzgerald)none

Emmy winner and three-time Grammy-nominated singer Toni Childs, who performed an electric set, getting amongst the crowd, told the ABC earlier that even though she knew the legendary Wave Hill walk-off story well, being on the ground was inimitable – especially as a cast of women performers.

“I think we are going to rock tonight, I can feel it in my bones,” she said. 

#AceNewsDesk report ………..Published: Aug.29: 2022:

Editor says …Sterling Publishing & Media Service Agency is not responsible for the content of external site or from any reports, posts or links, and can also be found here on Telegram: https://t.me/acenewsdaily and all wordpress and live posts and links here: https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

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Australian History

AUSTRALIAN HISTORY: Wurundjeri elder Aunty Margaret Gardiner’s quiet legacy for Victoria’s Aboriginal community

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#AceHistoryDesk Good luck to anyone trying to pull the wool over Aunty Margaret Gardiner’s eyes…………..” She wasn’t backward in coming forward, she’d ask a question, even if it was a bit prickly,” her brother, Uncle Andrew Gardiner, recalled with a smile.

Aunty Margaret Gardiner smiles, wearing a possum-skin cloak as she stands in front of a field in a black-and-white photo.
Wurundjeri elder Aunty Margaret Gardiner remained highly active in Aboriginal affairs throughout her later life.(Supplied)none

The family of the respected Wurundjeri elder, who passed away aged 63 this month, has given permission for her name and image to be used.

Uncle Andrew said his sister could be fairly blunt as she pursued bureaucrats, agencies and individuals for information on the issues affecting her community.

But there was a purpose to her tenacious investigations.

“To make sure that they were doing the right thing by the community that should have been dealt with,” Uncle Andrew said.

With a careful eye for detail, Aunty Margaret was constantly building up a “helicopter view” of Victorian Aboriginal affairs.

Aunty Margaret Gardiner holds a microphone as she stands, appearing serious, wrapped in a possum-skin cloak.
Aunty Margaret often spoke up to ensure concerns around cultural protocols and Aboriginal sovereignty were heard.(Supplied)none

“Her priority was cultural heritage, because that grounds everybody and that maintained her grounding as an Aboriginal woman,” Uncle Andrew said.

“She felt the need to do the right thing and not take handout grants from the government necessarily because she didn’t want to feel a cultural cringe that we were owning to the government rather than making decisions for ourselves about our cultural heritage.”

‘A fierce fighter for her people’

Born in Birchip in Victoria’s north-west in 1958, Aunty Margaret spent her early childhood years in nearby Charlton, before the family later moved to Melbourne.

There, she and her brother became more tightly connected with their mother’s family, including Aunty Winnie Quagliotti, a key elder in the Wurundjeri community who established the Wurundjeri corporation.

Andrew and Margaret Gardiner smile as they pose for a photograph together, as teenagers or young adults.
Margaret Gardiner and her brother Andrew grew up with a strong connection to their mother’s Wurundjeri culture.(Supplied)none

As a young woman, Aunty Margaret was quick to get to work for her community, starting off with a job at the Dandenong Aboriginal co-operative.

Through the 1970s and decades that followed, there were big changes in Victorian Aboriginal affairs as a surge in the number of community-run bodies delivered greater self-determination to Indigenous communities.

Aunty Margaret was in the thick of it, working at the former Mirimbiak Nations Aboriginal Corporation with Victorian native title groups to help traditional owners assert their rights over country.

She was also involved in significant projects capturing the oral histories of Victorian traditional owners, accumulating a deep knowledge of Aboriginal history across the state.

“She had that teaching and grounding about how to talk with elders and had that information and who was allowed to see it,” Uncle Andrew said.

Most recently, she sat on the board of the Birrarung Council, helping give a voice to the interests of the Birrarung (Yarra River) through a set of legislation she helped her Wurundjeri community push forward.

Uncle Andrew Gardiner appears thoughtful, dressed in a hat and rainjacket under grey skies in a green field.
Uncle Andrew Gardiner says his sister was passionate about safeguarding Aboriginal cultural heritage and values.(ABC News: Joseph Dunstan)none

After years of involvement in different community organisations, Uncle Andrew said his sister’s contributions would live on in simple but profound changes, such as improved access to housing and health services for Aboriginal people in Dandenong and Melbourne’s south-east.

“A lot of people say she was a fierce fighter for her people and she had this strength and she was staunch … yeah, because she kind of had to, she had to be able to do that representation for people,” he said.

In a letter of condolence to her family, a senior lawyer who had worked with Aunty Margaret gave their own insight into the elder’s formidable reputation.

“[The lawyer] mentioned that she was somewhat challenged at times to be able to respond to Marg’s questions, because they were very particular legal questions, and she’d go ‘ok I’ll have to go and research that’,” Uncle Andrew said.

‘She just led the way’

If you dropped in to see her, odds were her phone would be ringing hot, as Aboriginal community members from across the state sought her frank advice on matters of cultural protocol.

Gary Murray, a multi-clan human rights advocate who is a descendant of several nations including Wamba Wamba, Dhudhuroa, Yorta Yorta and Dja Dja Wurrung, said Aunty Margaret was a “leader at the highest level” when it came to cultural matters.

“In terms of the knowledge that she had from her ancestors and from her own connection to country, as well as where she worked,” he said.

As a multi-clan elder, she fought to protect the cultural interests of her other nations too, heading to court to raise her concerns about the right people speaking for country.

“I think she was outstanding in those matters,” Mr Murray said.

“She was always very articulate, very strong, exerted her rights … she just led the way.”

She was never one to embrace the spotlight but her family and others who worked alongside her say Aunty Margaret’s legacy shouldn’t be understated.

“Marg was one of those ones who did it quietly but very strongly and didn’t like to be acknowledged or recognised in a sense,” Mr Murray said.

“More recently, a particular university was offering her an honorary doctorate and she was very strong on saying no, she didn’t want it.”

Uncle Andrew, who is part of the First Peoples’ Assembly working to prepare Victoria for state-based treaties, said his sister was wary but interested in where that path could take her community.

“She was reserving her opinion about treaty, to see how it would work,” he said.

“But she wasn’t going back on what Wurundjeri’s opportunities and aspirations needed to be, either.”

Aunty Margaret is survived by her children Jemima Gardiner, Luke Gardiner, Mathew Gardiner and Jesse Rotumah-Gardiner.

A private funeral is planned for September 5, when she will be laid to rest at Coranderrk Aboriginal Cemetery in Healesville.

ABC (HISTORY) NEWS REPORT:

#AceNewsDesk report ………..Published: Aug.27:  2022:

Editor says …Sterling Publishing & Media Service Agency is not responsible for the content of external site or from any reports, posts or links, and can also be found here on Telegram: https://t.me/acenewsdaily and all wordpress and live posts and links here: https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com