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(NASA) JUST IN: On Saturday, Dec. 4, 2021, some people in the Southern Hemisphere will have the chance to experience a total or partial eclipse of the Sun #AceNewsDesk report

#AceNewsReport – Dec.04: During a total solar eclipse, the Sun, Moon, and Earth line up so that the Sun is blocked when viewed from within the Moon’s shadow on Earth.

#AceDailyNews NASA Report: On Dec. 4, 2021 Total Solar Eclipse The only place where this total solar eclipse can be seen is Antarctica.

En Español

The Moon passing in front of the Sun, briefly blocking out the light from the Sun. "Total Solar Eclipse" appears below.
Credits: Centro de Vuelo Espacial Goddard de la NASA

A solar eclipse happens when the Moon moves between the Sun and Earth, casting a shadow on Earth, fully or partially blocking the Sun’s light in some areas. For a total solar eclipse to take place, the Sun, Moon, and Earth must be in a direct line. People located in the center of the Moon’s shadow when it hits Earth will see a total eclipse. The sky becomes very dark, as if it were dawn or dusk. Weather permitting, people in the path of a total solar eclipse can see the Sun’s corona, the outer atmosphere, which is otherwise usually obscured by the bright face of the Sun.

In some places, while viewers won’t get to see the total solar eclipse, they’ll instead experience a partial solar eclipse. This happens when the Sun, Moon, and Earth are not exactly lined up. The Sun will appear to have a dark shadow on only part of its surface. Viewers in parts of Saint Helena, Namibia, Lesotho, South Africa, South Georgia and Sandwich Islands, Crozet Islands, Falkland Islands, Chile, New Zealand, and Australia will see a partial solar eclipse on Dec. 4.

In many of these locations, the eclipse will occur before, during, and after sunrise or sunset. This means that viewers will need to get a clear view of the horizon during sunrise or sunset in order to see the eclipse.

Live Stream

To see more details about exactly where this eclipse will occur, as well as more in-depth scientific information, please visit this page.

Download this fact sheet to learn more about eclipses, eclipse safety, and fun eclipse activities:

Weather permitting, a view of the total solar eclipse from Union Glacier, Antarctica, will be streamed on YouTube and on nasa.gov/live. This stream is courtesy of Theo Boris and Christian Lockwood of the JM Pasachoff Antarctic Expedition.

The stream starts at 1:30 a.m. EST. Totality begins at 2:44 a.m. EST. The stream ends at 3:37 a.m. EST.

How to Safely Watch a Total or Partial Solar Eclipse
It is never safe to look directly at the Sun, even if the Sun is partly or mostly obscured. When viewing a partial solar eclipse, you must wear solar viewing or eclipse glasses throughout the entire eclipse if you want to face the Sun. Solar viewing or eclipses glasses are NOT regular sunglasses; regular sunglasses are not safe for viewing the Sun.

If you are in the path of a total solar eclipse, you can take off your solar viewing or eclipse glasses only when the Moon is completely blocking the Sun. To learn when you can safely remove your glasses, see this page.

If you don’t have solar viewing or eclipse glasses, you can use an alternate indirect method, such as a pinhole projector. Pinhole projectors shouldn’t be used to look directly at the Sun, but instead to project sunlight onto a surface. Read a how-to guide for creating a pinhole viewer.

In October 2023, an annular solar eclipse will cross North America. Then, just six months later, in April 2024, a total solar eclipse will cross the continent. These events provide a unique opportunity for people in the United States to experience an eclipse.

Eclipse del 4 de diciembre de 2021

El sábado 4 de diciembre de 2021, algunos habitantes del hemisferio sur tendrán la oportunidad de experimentar un eclipse de Sol total o parcial.

The Moon passing in front of the Sun, briefly blocking out the light from the Sun. "Total Solar Eclipse" appears below.
Credits: Centro de Vuelo Espacial Goddard de la NASA

Durante un eclipse solar total, el Sol, la Luna y la Tierra se alinean de modo que el Sol queda bloqueado cuando es visto desde el interior de la sombra de la Luna sobre la Tierra.

Un eclipse solar ocurre cuando la Luna se sitúa entre el Sol y la Tierra, proyectando una sombra sobre la Tierra y bloqueando total o parcialmente la luz del Sol en algunas zonas. Para que se produzca un eclipse solar total, el Sol, la Luna y la Tierra deben alineados. Los habitantes en la zona ubicada en el centro de la sombra de la Luna cuando esta cae sobre la Tierra verán un eclipse total. El cielo se volverá muy oscuro, como si fuera el amanecer o el anochecer. Si las condiciones meteorológicas lo permiten, las personas situadas en el recorrido de un eclipse solar total pueden ver la corona del Sol, o su atmósfera exterior, que de otro modo suele estar oscurecida por la cara brillante del Sol.

El único lugar donde se podrá ver este eclipse solar total es la Antártida.

En algunos lugares, aunque los observadores no verán el eclipse solar total, podrán experimentar un eclipse solar parcial. Esto ocurre cuando el Sol, la Luna y la Tierra no están exactamente alineados. El Sol parecerá tener una sombra oscura solo en una parte de su superficie. Los observadores en algunas zonas de Santa Elena, Namibia, Lesoto, Sudáfrica, Islas Georgias del Sur y Sandwich del Sur, islas Crozet, islas Malvinas, Chile, Nueva Zelanda y Australia verán un eclipse solar parcial el 4 de diciembre.

En muchos de estos lugares, el eclipse ocurrirá antes, durante y después del amanecer o el atardecer. Esto significa que los observadores deberán tener una vista despejada del horizonte durante el amanecer o el atardecer para poder ver el eclipse.

Para ver más detalles sobre dónde ocurrirá exactamente este eclipse, así como información científica más detallada (en inglés), visita esta página.

Descarga esta hoja informativa para obtener más información acerca de los eclipses, cómo protegerse durante un eclipse y actividades divertidas para el eclipse:

Transmisión en vivo

Si las condiciones meteorológicas lo permiten, se transmitirá una vista del eclipse solar total desde el glaciar Unión, en la Antártida, a través de YouTube y en nasa.gov/live. Esta transmisión es cortesía de Theo Boris y Christian Lockwood de la Expedición Antártica JM Pasachoff.

La transmisión comienza a la 1:30 a.m., hora del este de EE.UU. La totalidad comienza a las 2:44 a.m., hora del este de EE.UU. La transmisión termina a las 3:37 a.m., hora del este de EE.UU.

Cómo observar un eclipse solar total o parcial de forma segura

Nunca es seguro mirar directamente al Sol, incluso si el Sol está total o parcialmente oscurecido. Al observar un eclipse solar parcial, debes usar lentes solares o lentes para ver eclipses durante todo el eclipse si deseas ver el Sol de frente. Los lentes solares o para eclipses NO son gafas comunes; las gafas de sol comunes no son seguras para ver el Sol.

Si estás en el recorrido de un eclipse solar total, puedes quitarte los lentes solares o para eclipses solamente cuando la Luna esté bloqueando completamente al Sol. Para saber cuándo puedes quitarte los lentes de forma segura, visita esta página.

Si no tienes lentes solares o lentes para ver eclipses, puede usar un método alternativo de visión indirecta, como un proyector estenopeico (de agujero). Los proyectores estenopeicos no deben ser usados para mirar al Sol directamente, sino para proyectar la luz solar sobre una superficie. Mira este video sobre cómo hacer un proyector estenopeico para ver un eclipse solar.

Mantente seguro sin dejar de disfrutar los espectáculos estelares del Sol creando tu propio visor con unos pocos materiales sencillos.

#AceNewsDesk report ………….Published: Dec.04: 2021:

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(WORLDWIDE) Ring of Fire Report: It’s celestial showtime on Thursday as much of the Northern Hemisphere gets to witness a solar eclipse #AceNewsDesk report

#AceNewsReport – June.11: Yes, not many people live there, but a good portion of the globe will still get treated to a partial eclipse where the Moon appears to take a big bite out of the Sun:

Solar Eclipse 2021: ‘Ring of Fire’ to sweep across the Earth this particular event is what’s termed an annular eclipse. It will see the Moon move across the face of our star but not completely block out the light coming from it but there will be just a thin sliver of brilliance left to shine around the Sun’s disc.

There’s some good advice here from BBC Sky At Night magazine and the Royal Astronomical Society and the Society for Popular Astronomy.

By Jonathan Amos
BBC Science Correspondent

Annular eclipse
A ring of brilliance will cross the top of the globe

Partial Solar Eclipse over the U.S. Capitol

Jun 10, 2021

A partial solar eclipse is seen as the sun rises to the left of the United States Capitol building, Thursday, June 10, 2021, as seen from Arlington, Virginia. The annular or “ring of fire” solar eclipse was visible in the far northern hemisphere.

Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls

A partial solar eclipse is seen as the Sun rises to the left of the United States Capitol building, Thursday, June 10, 2021, as seen from Arlington, Virginia. The full annular or “ring of fire” solar eclipse  visible to some people in Greenland, Northern Russia, and Canada. 

Last Updated: Jun 10, 2021

Editor: Brian Dunbar

Solar Eclipse over Delaware

Jun 10, 2021

A partial solar eclipse is seen as the sun rises behind the Delaware Breakwater Lighthouse, Thursday, June 10, 2021, at Lewes Beach in Delaware.

Credit: NASA/Aubrey Gemignani

A partial solar eclipse is seen as the sun rises behind the Delaware Breakwater Lighthouse, Thursday, June 10, 2021, at Lewes Beach in Delaware. The full annular or “ring of fire” solar eclipse was visible to some parts of Greenland, Northern Russia, and Canada.

This will include the eastern United States and northern Alaska, along with much of Canada, Greenland, and parts of Europe and Asia.

Last Updated: Jun 10, 2021

Editor: Brian Dunbar

The best of the action will be in the Arctic.

In the UK, the most favourable place to watch, in terms of the percentage of the Sun’s disc that gets covered up, will be in Scotland – somewhere like Lerwick in the Shetland Islands (11:27 BST), or Stornoway on the Isle of Lewis (11:18 BST)

These places will see about 40% of the Sun eclipsed.

But even down south, in London (11:13 BST) for example, 20% of the star will be covered over. 

As ever, the advice is not to try to look at the Sun with the naked eye. This can do severe damage.

Anyone gazing skyward should only do so with the aid of protective viewing equipment, such as approved eclipse glasses or a pinhole projector.

Better still, attend an organised event. Local astronomy clubs will be out in force to show people how to view the eclipse safely.

Robin ScagellA safe way to view the eclipse is via a projection technique

The so called “path of annularity” – the track across the Earth’s surface where the Moon sits entirely within the Sun’s disc to give the greatest spectacle – begins at sunrise in Ontario, Canada, at 09:49 GMT (10:49 BST).

It then sweeps across the top of the globe, including over the North Pole, to eventually reach Russia’s Far East and lift off the planet at sunset at 11:33 GMT (12:33 BST).Warning: Third party content may contain adverts

The place which enjoys the greatest duration eclipse – at almost four minutes in length – is in the middle of the Nares Strait, the narrow channel that divides the Canadian archipelago from Greenland.

There’ll be few there, however, to see 90% of the Sun’s disc being blocked out. Perhaps only the odd walrus or two on an ice floe.

For all other locations, there are plenty of calculators out there where you can input your nearest city or town to get more relevant timings, such as here.

Stefan SeipWhen the Moon is just that bit further away from Earth, it can’t block out the entirety of the Sun

Not every eclipse can be total. The Moon’s orbit around the Earth is not perfectly round; the satellite’s distance from the planet varies from about 356,500km to 406,700km (221,500 to 252,700 miles).

This difference makes the Moon’s apparent size in the sky fluctuate by about 13%.

If the Moon happens to eclipse the Sun on the near side of its orbit, it totally blocks out the star (a total eclipse). But if the Moon eclipses the Sun on the far side of its orbit, as now, the satellite will not completely obscure the star’s disc – and a “ring of fire” or annulus of sunlight is seen.

“An eclipse gives us an opportunity to connect with the Sun,” said Prof Lucie Green from the UCL Mullard Space Science Laboratory.

“Normally, our star is so dazzlingly bright we kind of don’t pay it much attention. But during an eclipse of one form or another, we’re able – if we look safely – to watch the Moon glide in front of the Sun and remind ourselves of this clockwork Solar System we live in,” she told BBC News.

#AceNewsDesk report ………Published: Jun.11: 2021:

Editor says #AceNewsDesk reports by https://t.me/acenewsdaily and all our posts, also links can be found at here for Twitter and Live Feeds https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com