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(NASA) Investigation of Microphysics and Precipitation for Atlantic Coast-Threatening Storms (IMPACTS) mission, which began in January and is planned to wrap up at the end of February #AceNewsDesk report

#AceNewsReport – Jan..31: The team is tracking storms across the Midwest and Eastern United States in two NASA planes equipped with scientific instruments to help understand the inner workings of winter storms as they form and develop. The team is flying two aircraft to investigate winter storms, one above the storm and one within the clouds. Each is equipped with a suite of scientific instruments to collect data about snow particles and the conditions in which they form.

#AceDailyNews NASA Report: Planes Fly into Snowstorms to Study Snowfall: Scientists repeatedly check the weather forecasts as they prepare aircraft for flight and perform last-minute checks on science instruments. There’s a large winter storm rolling in, but that’s exactly what these storm-chasing scientists are hoping for.

A satellite image showing a large, thick snow band after a winter storm brought snow to the Mid-Atlantic.

The experiments are part of the second deployment of NASA’s Investigation of Microphysics and Precipitation for Atlantic Coast-Threatening Storms (IMPACTS) mission, which began in January and is planned to wrap up at the end of February.

This data will help the team relate properties of the snow particles and their environment to large-scale processes ­– such as the structure of clouds and precipitation patterns – that can be seen with remote sensing instruments on aircraft and satellites. Ultimately, what the IMPACTS team learns about snowstorms will improve meteorological models and our ability to use satellite data to predict how much snow will fall and where.

Satellite image of snowfall after a large storm dumped wet, heavy snow across the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States.

On Jan. 4, 2022, the MODIS instrument aboard NASA’s Terra satellite captured this image of snowfall after a large storm dumped wet, heavy snow across the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States. Some areas accumulated over 14 inches, shutting down businesses, schools, and interstate highways.

Surveying a Variety of Storms

Storms often form narrow structures called snow bands, said Lynn McMurdie, principal investigator for IMPACTS and an atmospheric scientist at the University of Washington in Seattle. One of the main goals of IMPACTS is to understand how these structures form, why some storms don’t have snow bands, and how snow bands can be used to predict snowfall. To do this, the team hopes to sample a wide variety of storms throughout the three-year IMPACTS campaign.

During the 2020 IMPACTS campaign, the team sampled a variety of storms in the Midwest and East Coast, including warmer rainstorms and storms with strong cold fronts and convection. But McMurdie says the team didn’t see a Nor’easter, a storm with a strong low-pressure system that moves up the New England coast and mixes moisture from the Atlantic Ocean with cold air from Canada. 

Nor’easters come up the East Coast and can dump several feet of snow, effectively shutting down cities, said John Yorks, one of the deputy principal investigators for IMPACTS at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. Being better able to predict where these storms will bring snow and how much could help cities better prepare for severe winter weather.

Above, Below and Into the Clouds

NASA and its partners have several satellites that measure precipitation from space, such as the Global Precipitation Measurement mission that observes rain and snow around most of the world every three hours. “But satellites can’t tell us a lot about the particles – the actual snowflakes ­– and where they form within the clouds,” said Gerry Heymsfield, one of the deputy principal investigators for IMPACTS at Goddard. IMPACTS is run out of NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia, which is managed by Goddard.

Instead, IMPACTS is flying two aircraft outfitted with scientific instruments. The NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center’s ER-2, a high-altitude jet flying out of the Pope Army Airfield near Fayetteville, North Carolina, will fly at about 65,000 feet to get a top-down view from above the clouds. The instruments aboard the ER-2 are similar to those on satellites but with higher spatial resolution, additional measurement capabilities and more frequent sampling. Scientists on the ground are also measuring cloud properties from below using ground-based radars.

NASA’s ER-2, a high-altitude jet equipped with a suite of science instruments, takes off.
NASA’s ER-2, a high-altitude jet equipped with a suite of science instruments, takes off.Credits: NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center

“A project like IMPACTS can really complement those spacecraft measurements with aircraft measurements that are higher resolution, higher accuracy, sample an event more frequently, and provide additional parameters such as Doppler measurements,” said Yorks.

The other aircraft, the P-3 Orion based out of Wallops, flies at altitudes up to 26,000 feet. Probes hanging off the P-3’s wings measure the size, shape and distribution of precipitation particles. Flying the P-3 at different altitudes allows the team to measure snow particles throughout the cloud, and the temperature, water vapor, and other conditions in which they form.

The P-3 also drops small instruments, called dropsondes, over the ocean. These instruments work like weather balloons in reverse, measuring temperature, wind and humidity in the atmosphere as they fall. The team is also launching weather balloons every few hours as the storm passes overhead from several sites that move depending on which storm the team is studying. The data collected by the dropsondes and weather balloons provide information about the atmospheric conditions before, during and after the storm.

“Snowstorms are really complicated storms, and we need every piece of data – models, aircraft instruments, meteorological soundings – to really figure out what’s going on within these storms,” said Heymsfield. 

The multi-year IMPACTS campaign is the first comprehensive study of snowstorms across the Eastern United States in 30 years. The science team includes researchers from NASA, several universities across the country, the National Center for Atmospheric Research, and NOAA, including partners at the National Weather Service.

To learn more about the mission, visit: https://espo.nasa.gov/impacts/content/IMPACTS


By Sofie Bates
NASA’s Earth Science News Team

Last Updated: Jan 28, 2022: Editor: Sofie Bates

#AceNewsDesk report ……….Published: Jan.31: 2022:

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(WASHINGTON, D.C.) National Zoo SNOW Day: See Pandas, Elephants, Cheetahs and More Enjoy a Snow Day Enjoy #AceDailyNews report

Happy snow day America

#AceNewsReport – Jan.10: For zoo animals, a blanket of fluffy snow on the ground creates the perfect stage for somersaults, scampering and snowflake-covered fur.

😅😅😅😅

#AceDailyNews says at least six inches of snowfall covered Washington, D.C. this week causing closures and delays for residents, but the zoo animals were out to play by Rachael LallensackJanuary 4, 2022

A gif image of a panda cub rolling in the snow
Panda cub Xiao Qi Ji somersaults through the fresh powder. National Zoo via YouTube

Cities on the United States’ East Coast were slammed by winter storms this week with snowfall totals between 6 to 12 inches in some areas, per Aamer Madhani and Parker Purifoy for the Associated Press. Schools and businesses announced delays and closures, while nearly 500,000 homes faced power outages due to gusty winds, Jason Samenow reports for the Washington Post.Although the Smithsonian’s National Zoo in Washington, D.C. was officially closedon Monday and Tuesday, its critters welcomed the new year with several snow days all to themselves. Giant pandas, bison, elephants, sloth bears, cheetahs and more have been enjoying visitor-free time outside in the fresh powder

Sloth bears Niko and Deemak playfully duked it out in the fluffy stuff. The Zoo’s bison stayed warm with their thick fuzzy fur while chewing on hay, and elephants took a few steps out into the frozen world as well.

A Bennett's wallaby gazes at the camera with snowflake-coated lashes
A Bennett’s wallaby gazes at the camera with snowflake-coated lashes. National Zoo

At the Conservation Biology Institute in Front Royal, Virginia, a cheetah and her cubs watched the flakes fall to the ground while they groomed frosty bits of ice off of each other.

Though kangaroos and wallabies prefer subtropical climates in the wild, the Bennett’s wallaby at the National Zoo is sure looking cute with snowflake-dappled eyelashes and fur.

Australian Snow Kangaroos 🤦‍♀️🤦‍♀️

Born August 2020, giant panda cub Xiao Qi Ji wasn’t too keen about his first snow experience last year—although his panda companionscertainly had a great time.

With his mama Mei Xiang seen behind him in video footage, he’s much more excited about the snowfall this year. The 16-month-old panda cub tumbled boldly into the bushes and slid headfirst on his belly down a small hill in his enclosure. Later, the two can be seen tussling in the trees.Though snowfall has paused for now, strong winds continue to damage trees and power lines while low temperatures overnight caused slushy areas to refreeze, per the Post. Another storm is expected to reach the nation’s capitol again on Thursday.

#AceNewsDesk report ………..Published: Jan.10: 2022:

Boss great day in the department, you got caught again 💯💯💯 😅😅

Editor says …Sterling Publishing & Media Service Agency is not responsible for the content of external site or from any reports, posts or links, and can also be found here on Telegram: https://t.me/acenewsdaily all of our posts fromTwitter can be found here: https://acetwitternews.wordpress.com/ and all wordpress and live posts and links here: https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

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(AUSTRALIA) JUST IN: BOM REPORT: Jonathan How from the Bureau is not mincing his words about what the weather has in store for us this week bracing for wind, rain and snow #AceWeatherDesk report

#AceNewsReport – June.07: If you have any winter clothes left in the cupboard, it is time to get them out: Jonathan How from the Bureau of Meteorology is not mincing his words about what the weather has in store for us this week:

#AceWeatherDesk – BOM Report: Warns to brace for wintry week of wind, rain and snow: It’s really looking like a multi-state, multi-hazard event for millions of Australians — a bit of a rude shock to the system.” The last significant snowfall event for northern NSW and southern Queensland was back in 2015.” ….While these falls are not expected to be quite as dramatic as 2015, snow melt can bring about delayed flooding, so keep on top of those warnings, even after the system is expected to clear off Friday and into Saturday. Kindness & LoveX❤️ says be safe Friends, Followers & Readers Amen 🙏’s

A car drove down a snow-covered street at Mount Hotham.
Blizzard conditions are expected this week as a cold blast comes up from the Southern Ocean. (Supplied: Mount Hotham)

It’s starting off in South Australia and western Victoria today as a vigorous cold front sweeps through.

It is set to reach Adelaide through to western Victoria this afternoon and to reach Melbourne and Hobart in the wee hours of the morning.Youtube The weather bureau issues a severe weather update.

The front is expected to bring rain showers, thunderstorms and small hail, making it a good time to check all the windows are thoroughly shut and forget about doing the washing. 

By Tuesday and Wednesday the front will be pushing up through New South Wales and Queensland, bringing heavy falls.

But the front is only the beginning.

In its wake will be an icy blast and a coastal low that will drive daily rainfall totals of between 50 and 100 millimetres from Wednesday.

While it does not meet the criteria for an East Coast Low, Mr How did not rule out one forming.

Regardless of its label, this low is set to pack plenty of punch.   

Southern and eastern-facing slopes are most at risk, with the potential for riverine, flash flooding and even blizzard conditions. 

Bring on the snow

Synoptic weather maps showing one low over the east and another over the west on Wednesday
While one low forms over the east, another is heading for the west coast. (Supplied: BOM)

Snow is expected down to 900 metres in South Australia from Tuesday before icing the Grampians in Victoria and Central Highlands in Tasmania.

Heavy falls are expected over the alpine regions just in time for the start of ski season this weekend.

The snow is then expected to make its way north, dusting the Blue Mountains and Central and Northern Tablelands in NSW. 

The hills around Canberra can also expect a coating. 

The best chance for snow in Queensland is overnight Wednesday into Thursday across the Darling Downs. 

“For Queensland, it certainly is quite unusual but not unheard of,” Mr How said. 

“They generally only see snow every two to three years.

West also expecting a wet week

Another low is deepening off Western Australia, this time fuelled by tropical moisture. 

Wind and showery rain is expected from Wednesday, with high winds expected Wednesday and Thursday as the system pushes through the South West. 

Luckily, it looks like the worst of the weather will stay offshore but swells are expected to be up. 

Keep up to date with weather warnings via ABC Emergency and rug up properly if you are brave enough to venture outside. Youtube The BOM’s 2021 winter outlook

#AceWeatherDesk report ……Published: Jun.07: 2021:

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