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Global Warming & Climate Change

(WORLDWIDE) Global Warming Report: 2021 was tied for the sixth warmest year on NASA’s record, stretching more than a century. Because the record is global, not every place on Earth experienced the sixth warmest year on record #AceNewsDesk report

#AceNewsReport – Jan.15: Some places had record-high temperatures, and we saw record droughts, floods and fires around the globe.

#AceNewsDesk says according to global warming report Earth’s global average surface temperature in 2021 tied with 2018 as the sixth warmest on record, according to independent analyses done by NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

Credits: NASA’s Scientific Visualization Studio/Kathryn Mersmann

Lee esta nota de prensa en español aquí.

Continuing the planet’s long-term warming trend, global temperatures in 2021 were 1.5 degrees Fahrenheit (0.85 degrees Celsius) above the average for NASA’s baseline period, according to scientists at NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) in New York. NASA uses the period from 1951-1980 as a baseline to see how global temperature changes over time.

Collectively, the past eight years are the warmest years since modern recordkeeping began in 1880. This annual temperature data makes up the global temperature record – which tells scientists the planet is warming.

According to NASA’s temperature record, Earth in 2021 was about 1.9 degrees Fahrenheit (or about 1.1 degrees Celsius) warmer than the late 19th century average, the start of the industrial revolution.

“Science leaves no room for doubt: Climate change is the existential threat of our time,” said NASA Administrator Bill Nelson. “Eight of the top 10 warmest years on our planet occurred in the last decade, an indisputable fact that underscores the need for bold action to safeguard the future of our country – and all of humanity. NASA’s scientific research about how Earth is changing and getting warmer will guide communities throughout the world, helping humanity confront climate and mitigate its devastating effects.”

This warming trend around the globe is due to human activities that have increased emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. The planet is already seeing the effects of global warming: Arctic sea ice is declining, sea levels are rising, wildfires are becoming more severe and animal migration patterns are shifting. Understanding how the planet is changing – and how rapidly that change occurs – is crucial for humanity to prepare for and adapt to a warmer world.

Weather stations, ships, and ocean buoys around the globe record the temperature at Earth’s surface throughout the year. These ground-based measurements of surface temperature are validated with satellite data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite. Scientists analyze these measurements using computer algorithms to deal with uncertainties in the data and quality control to calculate the global average surface temperature difference for every year. NASA compares that global mean temperature to its baseline period of 1951-1980. That baseline includes climate patterns and unusually hot or cold years due to other factors, ensuring that it encompasses natural variations in Earth’s temperature.

Many factors affect the average temperature any given year, such as La Nina and El Nino climate patterns in the tropical Pacific. For example, 2021 was a La Nina year and NASA scientists estimate that it may have cooled global temperatures by about 0.06 degrees Fahrenheit (0.03 degrees Celsius) from what the average would have been.

A separate, independent analysis by NOAA also concluded that the global surface temperature for 2021 was the sixth highest since record keeping began in 1880. NOAA scientists use much of the same raw temperature data in their analysis and have a different baseline period (1901-2000) and methodology.

“The complexity of the various analyses doesn’t matter because the signals are so strong,” said Gavin Schmidt, director of GISS, NASA’s leading center for climate modeling and climate change research. “The trends are all the same because the trends are so large.”

NASA’s full dataset of global surface temperatures for 2021, as well as details of how NASA scientists conducted the analysis, are publicly available from GISS.

GISS is a NASA laboratory managed by the Earth Sciences Division of the agency’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. The laboratory is affiliated with Columbia University’s Earth Institute and School of Engineering and Applied Science in New York.

For more information about NASA’s Earth science missions, visit:

https://www.nasa.gov/earth

-end-Last Updated: Jan 13, 2022: Editor: Robert Margetta

#AceNewsDesk report ………Published: Jan.15: 2022:

Editor says …Sterling Publishing & Media Service Agency is not responsible for the content of external site or from any reports, posts or links, and can also be found here on Telegram: https://t.me/acenewsdaily all of our posts fromTwitter can be found here: https://acetwitternews.wordpress.com/ and all wordpress and live posts and links here: https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

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(NASA) NOAA Weather Observing Satellite Launch Report: GOES-T is scheduled to launch March 1, 2022, on a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 541 rocket from Space Launch Complex-41 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida #AceNewsDesk report

#AceNewsReport – Jan.04: Media prelaunch and launch activities will take place at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Media wishing to take part in person must apply for credentials at:

#AceDailyNews NASA Report: Media accreditation is now open for the upcoming launch of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) GOES-T satellite, the Western Hemisphere’s most advanced weather observing and environmental monitoring system….https://media.ksc.nasa.gov

An artist’s rendering of GOES-R.

International media residing in the United States must apply by Saturday, Jan. 8, 2022. U.S. media must apply by Thursday, Jan. 27, 2022.

NASA’s media accreditation policy is online. For questions about accreditation, please email: ksc-media-accreditat@mail.nasa.gov. For other mission questions, please contact Kennedy’s newsroom at: 321-867-2468.

Credentialed media will receive a confirmation email with the latest COVID-19 guidelines. If you have special logistical requests, such as space for satellite trucks, tents, or electrical connections, please contact Allison Tankersley at allison.p.tankersley@nasa.gov by Feb. 21, 2022.

About GOES-T

NOAA manages the GOES-R Series Program through an integrated NOAA-NASA office, administering its ground system contract, operating the satellites, and distributing their data to users worldwide.

GOES-T will be renamed GOES-18 once it reaches geostationary orbit. Following a successful orbital checkout of its instruments and systems, GOES-18 will go into operational service as GOES West. In this position, the satellite will provide critical data for the U.S. West Coast, Alaska, Hawaii, Mexico, Central America, and the Pacific Ocean.

The launch is managed by NASA’s Launch Services Program based at Kennedy, America’s multi-user spaceport. NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, oversees the acquisition of the GOES-R satellite and instruments. Lockheed Martin designs, creates, and tests the GOES-R Series satellites. L3Harris Technologies provides the main instrument payload, the Advanced Baseline Imager, and the ground system, which includes the antenna system for data reception.

For more information about GOES-T, visit: https://go.nasa.gov/3esXZcw

Para obtener información sobre cobertura en español en el Centro Espacial Kennedy o si desea solicitar entrevistas en español, comuníquese con Antonia Jaramillo 321-501-8425.

-end-Last Updated: Dec 27, 2021: Editor: Robert Margetta

#AceNewsDesk report ………Published: Jan.04: 2022:

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Editor says …Sterling Publishing & Media Service Agency is not responsible for the content of external site or from any reports, posts or links, and can also be found here on Telegram: https://t.me/acenewsdaily all of our posts fromTwitter can be found here: https://acetwitternews.wordpress.com/ and all wordpress and live posts and links here: https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

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(NASA) JUST IN: The center of #HurricaneElsa has formed to the east of the Windward and southern Leeward islands and is expected to bring heavy rainfall to those areas over the weekend #AceNewsDesk report

#AceNewsReport – July.04: The storm is moving toward the west-northwest at almost 30 miles an hour, and its forecast track could bring it to the Florida Keys early next week.

#AceDailyNews reports that US Coast Guard & NOAA are preparing for arrival of hurricane as NASA Scientists Available for Interviews on Hurricanes, Tropical Storm according to an update Friday from the National Hurricane Center.

Side-by-side image of Hurricane Laura as it approaches the United States Aug. 26, 2020. The left shows a bright swirl on a black background and the right shows a white swirl on a light background.

June 1 marked the official start of the Atlantic hurricane season, which officially ends Nov. 30: After 2020 brought a record number of named storms in the Atlantic basin, NASA is once again prepared to help understand and monitor these storms from the unique vantage of space with experts available to provide insights on hurricanes and other extreme weather events.

Using data from its 20-plus Earth-observing satellites, NASA plays a foundational role in the science of hurricanes: For operational forecasting, the agency’s main role is through its crucial partnership with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). NASA designs, builds, and launches NOAA’s suite of satellites that provide the data that specifically feed numerical weather prediction models. Scientists from NASA and NOAA also collaborate to continuously improve these models.

Climate change is increasing the heat in the ocean basins and making it more likely that storms will intensify faster and become stronger, a phenomenon NASA scientists continue to study.

“ As climate change intensifies and makes natural hazards like hurricanes more damaging, NASA is more committed than ever to innovative Earth science research,” said NASA Administrator Bill Nelson. “Our next-generation Earth System Observatory will build on NASA’s existing capabilities to provide an unprecedented understanding of the Earth from bedrock to atmosphere, so we are better prepared to protect our communities from hurricanes and other extreme weather events.”

NASA’s goal for disaster preparedness, response, mitigation, and recovery is bridging the gap between data and the people who need it. Before, during, and after a hurricane or tropical storm makes landfall, NASA satellites are in prime position to identify impacts.

NASA works with local officials and first responders, federal agencies such as FEMA and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and infrastructure experts to determine what information they need and to supply it in usable formats in real time. Examples include information on infrastructure failures and disruptions, contaminated water supplies, and other hotspots for urgent response needs.

NASA welcomes media inquiries about its role in studying and understanding hurricanes. NASA scientists and experts, who represent a cross-section of expertise in hurricane science, such as atmospheric science, oceanography and modeling, as well as NASA’s disaster response, are available for media interviews, as schedules allow.

To inquire about interview availability with these scientists, please contact Jacob Richmond at: jacob.a.richmond@nasa.gov.

For general NASA hurricane science reference material, visit: https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2021/nasa-and-hurricanes-five-fast-facts and https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hurricanes/news/index.html

The following are some of NASA’s most popular public-domain, open-source imagery products:

All NASA-created content is in the public domain and free for media usage:

For other Earth science videos, visit: https://www.youtube.com/NASAGoddard

For all NASA scientific data visualizations and animations, visit: https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/

Last Updated: Jul 2, 2021: Editor: Tabatha Thompson

#AceNewsDesk report ………Published: July.04: 2021:

Editor says …Sterling Publishing & Media Service Agency is not responsible for the content of external site or from any reports, posts or links, and can also be found here on Telegram: https://t.me/acenewsdaily all of our posts fromTwitter can be found here: https://acetwitternews.wordpress.com/ and all wordpress and live posts and links here: https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

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(NASA) June 01: Began the ‘Atlantic Hurricane Season’ and they aredeveloping new technology and missions to study storm formation and impacts, including ways to understand Earth as a system #AceNewsDesk report

NASA & Hurricanes: Five Fast Facts: The 2021 Atlantic hurricane season starts today, June 1. Our colleagues at NOAA are predicting another active season, with an above average number of named storms. At NASA, we’re developing new technology and missions to study storm formation and impacts, including ways to understand Earth as a system.

Natural color image of Hurricane Iota in the Gulf of Mexico.
False color view of a swirling hurricane from space, showing the blue clouds in 3-D against a yellow ocean.

1. NASA can see storms from space.

From space, NASA can see so much more than what’s visible to the naked eye. Among NASA’s missions, NASA and NOAA have joint satellite missions monitoring storms in natural color — what our eyes see — as well as in other wavelengths of light, which can help identify features our eyes can’t on their own. For instance, images taken in infrared can show the temperatures of clouds, as well as allow us to track the movement of storms at night.

Two images side by side of a Hurricane Laura approaching New Orleans over the Gulf of Mexico, the left view in infrared and the right in natural color.

2. Satellites can see inside hurricanes in 3D.

If you’ve ever had a CT scan or X-ray done, you know how important 3D imagery can be to understanding what’s happening on the inside. The same concept applies to hurricanes. NASA’s Global Precipitation Measurement mission’s radar and microwave instruments can see through storm clouds to see the precipitation structure of the storm and measure how much total rain is falling as a result of the storm. This information helps scientists understand how the storm may change over time and understand the risk of severe flooding.https://www.youtube.com/embed/A7MIVsE2oMM?rel=0

For the first time in 360-degrees, this data visualization takes you inside hurricane Maria.

Credits: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

3. We’re looking at how climate change affects hurricane behavior.

Climate change is likely causing storms to behave differently. One change is in how storms intensify: More storms are increasing in strength quickly, a process called rapid intensification, where hurricane wind speeds increase by 35 mph (or more) in just 24 hours. 

In 2020, a record-tying nine storms rapidly intensified. These quick changes in storm strength can leave communities in their path without time to properly prepare.

Researchers at NASA JPL developed a machine learning model that could more accurately detect rapidly intensifying storms.

A natural color image of the powerful Category 4 Hurricane Laura in the Gulf of Mexico.

It’s not just about how quickly hurricanes gain strength. Scientists at NASA are also looking at how climate change may be causing storms to move more slowly, which makes them more destructive. These “stalled” storms can slow to just a few miles an hour, dumping rain and damaging winds on one location at a time. Hurricane Dorian, for example, stalled over Grand Bahama and left catastrophic damage in its wake. Hurricanes Harvey and Florence experienced stalling as well, both causing major flooding.

View from the International Space Station showing the white spiral clouds of Hurricane Dorian dominating the ocean.

4. We can monitor damage done by hurricanes. 

Hurricane Maria reshaped Puerto Rico’s forests. The storm destroyed so many large trees that the overall height of the island’s forests was shortened by one-third. Measurements from the ground, the air, and space gave researchers insights into which trees were more susceptible to wind damage.https://www.youtube.com/embed/QeGFaqwDY3s?rel=0

Credits: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

Months after Hurricane Maria, parts of Puerto Rico still didn’t have power. Using satellite data, NASA researchers mapped which neighborhoods were still dark and analyzed demographics and physical attributes of the areas with the longest wait for power.https://www.youtube.com/embed/vZkwASBe2zo?rel=0

Credits: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

5. We help communities prepare for storms and respond to their aftermath.

The data NASA collects is available for free to the public. NASA also partners with other federal agencies, like FEMA, and regional and local governments to help prepare for and understand the impacts of disasters like hurricanes. 

In 2020, NASA’s Disasters Program provided data to groups in Alabama, Louisiana, and Central America to identify regions significantly affected by hurricanes. This helps identify vulnerable communities and make informed decisions about where to send resources.

Satellite image at night showing cities lights in the southern U.S. at the top of the image and beneath over the Gulf of Mexico three hurricanes in a row: from left to right Katia, Irma, and Jose.

Working together with partners at NOAA, FEMA and elsewhere, NASA is ready to help communities weather another year of storms.

By Katy Mersmann

NASA’s Earth Science News Team

Media Contact: Peter Jacobs, Goddard Space Flight Center

Last Updated: Jun 1, 2021

Editor: Ellen Gray

#AceNewsDesk report ……Published: Jun.05: 2021:

Editor says #AceNewsDesk reports by https://t.me/acenewsdaily and all our posts, also links can be found at here for Twitter and Live Feeds https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com