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WOLF MOON: The first full moon of 2022 on Jan. 17 alongside the Martin Luther King holiday in the United States expected a dazzling (if chilly) view of Earth’s neighbor, weather permitting #AceNewsDesk report

#AceNewsReport – Jan.19: Full moons occur when the moon is exactly on the opposite side of the Earth from the sun. As a result, the moon looks illuminated because we see the sun’s light reflected from it. Tonight’s Wolf Moon will appear full through Wednesday morning and skywatchers may also see the bright star Pollux near the full moon, which is the brightest star in the constellation Gemini, according to a statement from NASA.

#AceNewsDesk says according to Space Site News Report: The January full moon, also known as the full Wolf Moon, reached its peak at 6:48 p.m. EST (1148 GMT). However, skywatchers will begin to see the moon rise about 24 minutes before sunset. For New York City observers, the full moon will rose at 4:31 p.m. local time, according to Time and Date: By Samantha Mathewson published 17 January 22

The first full moon of 2022, the full Wolf Moon, will rise over Earth on Jan. 17, 2022. This view shows a full moon as only astronauts on the International Space Station can see.
The first full moon of 2022, the full Wolf Moon, will rise over Earth on Jan. 17, 2022. This view shows a full moon as only astronauts on the International Space Station can see. (Image credit: NASA)

If you’re hoping to snap a good photo of the first full moon of 2022. We can help. Check out our guide on how to photograph the moon. If you’re looking for a camera, here’s our overview on the best cameras for astrophotography and best lenses for astrophotography.

Related: Night sky, January 2022: What you can see this month

“Stay warm, but when the sky is clear, take advantage of these early nightfalls and late sunrises to get out, look up, and share the wonders of the sky!” NASA’s Gordon Johnston wrote in the full moon guide for January and February. 

The January full moon is traditionally called the Wolf Moon because wolves can be heard howling at the moon more around this time of year. It was believed that wolves howled more during the winter due to hunger. However, howling can also be a sign of wolves defining territory, trying to locate other pack members, reinforcing social bonds or coordinating hunting, according to The Farmers’ Almanac.

In addition to “Wolf Moon,” the January full moon has a few other monikers it goes by. For example, the Assiniboine people of the Northern Great Plains have referred to this month’s full moon as the Center Moon because it rises during the middle of the cold season in the Northern Hemisphere. 

According to The Farmers’ Almanac, other full moon names include the Cold Moon, the Frost Exploding Moon, the Freeze Up Moon, the Severe Moon, the Hard Moon, the Canada Goose Moon, the Great Moon, the Greetings Moon and the Spirit Moon — all of which represent the extreme temperatures of the winter season and welcoming of the New Year. NASA’s full moon guide also refers to January’s Wolf Moon as the Ice Moon, the Moon after Yule and the Old Moon.

Editor’s note: If you have an amazing night sky photo or video that you’d like to share for a possible story or image gallery, let us know! You can send in images and comments to spacephotos@space.com.

Photographers around the country have captured 2022’s first full moon. 

After peeking above the horizon mid-afternoon, sky gazers saw the wolf moon reach its fullest at 23:48 GMT.

Its name is thought to be linked to the time of year when wolves are most vocal ahead of their February breeding season.

Here are some of the best shots from around Wales.

#AceNewsDesk report ………..Published: Jan.19: 2022:

Editor says …Sterling Publishing & Media Service Agency is not responsible for the content of external site or from any reports, posts or links, and can also be found here on Telegram: https://t.me/acenewsdaily all of our posts fromTwitter can be found here: https://acetwitternews.wordpress.com/ and all wordpress and live posts and links here: https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

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STONEHENGE: The moon moves through many phases and can have a profound effect on our energy and mindset as it transitions through the night sky: So what are the full moon dates and names in 2022?

Stargazers are set to witness some impressive celestial sights in 2022. As well as the full moons that come round every month, there will also be a series of supermoons to look out for.

Full Moon over Stonehenge: Photo credits to Stonehenge Dronescapes

Here’s all of the full moon dates for 2022.January 17th 2022: Full Wolf MoonFebruary 15th 2022: Full Snow MoonMarch 18th 2022: Full Worm MoonApril 16th 2022: Full Pink MoonMay 16th 2022: Full Flower MoonJune 14th 2022: Full Strawberry MoonJuly 13th 2022: Full Black MoonAugust 12th 2022: Full Sturgeon MoonSeptember 10th 2022: Full Harvest MoonOctober 9th 2022: Full Hunters MoonNovember 8th 2022: Full Frost MoonDecember 8th 2022: Full Cold Moon

There are heaps of celestial events to look forward to in 2022. From meteor showers to solstices, equinoxes and glowing supermoons, Country Living have compiled your ultimate calendar guide to the very best astronomical events.

Stonehenge is situated on the edge of Salisbury Plain, the Landscape occupies a large, sparsely populated area ideal for stargazing.  These dark skies provide the perfect environment to see the stars in all their detail, so why not organise a night-time trip to see what you can discover? The National Trust mention Stonehenge as one of their top stargazing spots in the south west of England and it’s easy to see why. The timeless landscape surrounding Stonehenge is sparsely populated owing to the fact of its close proximity to Salisbury Plain and also due to Stonehenge being part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site. Keep an eye out for stargazing events organised by the National Trust and English Heritage here. 

Full Moon and Stonehenge Related links:

Stonehenge Dronescapes 2022 A3 Calendar – Purchase on EBAY
When is the next full Moon? Royal Museum Greenwich
Ancient Skies: Stonehenge and the Moon – Stonehenge News Blog
A simple-to-use tool for exploring and looking at the different Phases of the Moon. Moon Phases 2022.
Full list of 2022 astronomical events to look for – Daily Express
When is the next full moon? Your lunar astronomy guide – Science Focus
Visit Stonehenge and learn more about the astronomy of Stonehenge – Stonehenge Guided Tours8 must-see stargazing events to watch in 2022 – National Geographic
Month-by-month calendar guide to the best celestial events in 2022 – Country Living
Stonehenge and Ancient Astronomy. Stonehenge and Avebury World Heritage Site
Stonehenge Full Moon Guided Walking Tours. Explore the landscape with a local historian and astronomer.
Stonehenge Dronescapes. Amazing photos of Stonehenge. Visit the Facebookpage
Guided Tours of Stonehenge from Bath and Salisbury – Stonehenge and Salisbury Guided Tours

#AceNewsDesk report ………….Published: Jan.16: 2022:

Editor says …Sterling Publishing & Media Service Agency is not responsible for the content of external site or from any reports, posts or links, and can also be found here on Telegram: https://t.me/acenewsdaily all of our posts fromTwitter can be found here: https://acetwitternews.wordpress.com/ and all wordpress and live posts and links here: https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

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(NASA) Juno Spacecraft ‘Hears’ Jupiter’s Moon sounds from a Ganymede flyby, magnetic fields, and remarkable comparisons between Jupiter and Earth’s oceans and atmospheres were discussed during a briefing today’s mission to Jupiter at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting in New Orleans #AceNewsDesk report

#AceNewsReport – Dec.20: This soundtrack is just wild enough to make you feel as if you were riding along as Juno sails past Ganymede for the first time in more than two decades,” said Bolton. “If you listen closely, you can hear the abrupt change to higher frequencies around the midpoint of the recording, which represents entry into a different region in Ganymede’s magnetosphere.

#AceDailyNews says according to a NASA News Report: Juno Principal Investigator Scott Bolton of the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio has debuted a 50-second audio track generated from data collected during the mission’s close flyby of the Jovian moon Ganymede on June 7, 2021. Juno’s Waves instrument, which tunes in to electric and magnetic radio waves produced in Jupiter’s magnetosphere, collected the data on those emissions. Their frequency was then shifted into the audio range to make the audio track.

Two of Jupiter's large rotating storms
Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/Univ of Iowa

An audio track collected during Jupiter mission’s Ganymede flyby offers a dramatic ride-along. It is one of the highlights mission scientists shared in a briefing at American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting.

Radio emissions collected during Juno’s June 7, 2021, flyby of Jupiter’s moon Ganymede are presented here, both visually and in sound.

Detailed analysis and modeling of the Waves data are ongoing. “It is possible the change in the frequency shortly after closest approach is due to passing from the nightside to the dayside of Ganymede,” said William Kurth of the University of Iowa in Iowa City, lead co-investigator for the Waves investigation. 

Ganymede

This image of the Jovian moon Ganymede was obtained by the JunoCam imager aboard NASA’s Juno spacecraft during its June 7, 2021, flyby of the icy moon.Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS

At the time of Juno’s closest approach to Ganymede – during the mission’s 34th trip around Jupiter – the spacecraft was within 645 miles (1,038 kilometers) of the moon’s surface and traveling at a relative velocity of 41,600 mph (67,000 kph).  

Magnetic Jupiter

Jack Connerney from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, is the lead investigator with Juno’s magnetometer and is the mission’s deputy principal investigator. His team has produced the most detailed map ever obtained of Jupiter’s magnetic field. 

Compiled from data collected from 32 orbits during Juno’s prime mission, the map provides new insights into the gas giant’s mysterious Great Blue Spot, a magnetic anomaly at the planet’s equator. Juno data indicates that a change in the gas giant’s magnetic field has occurred during the spacecraft’s five years in orbit, and that the Great Blue Spot is drifting eastward at a speed of about 2 inches (4 centimeters) per second relative to the rest of Jupiter’s interior, lapping the planet in about 350 years.

In contrast, the Great Red Spot – the long-lived atmospheric anticyclone just south of Jupiter’s equator – is drifting westward at a relatively rapid clip, circling the planet in about four-and-a-half years. 

In addition, the new map shows that Jupiter’s zonal winds (jet streams that run east to west and west to east, giving Jupiter’s its distinctive banded appearance) are pulling the Great Blue Spot apart. This means that the zonal winds measured on the surface of the planet reach deep into the planet’s interior.

The new magnetic field map also allows Juno scientists to make comparisons with Earth’s magnetic field. The data suggests to the team that dynamo action – the mechanism by which a celestial body generates a magnetic field – in Jupiter’s interior occurs in metallic hydrogen, beneath a layer expressing “helium rain.”

Data Juno collects during its extended mission may further unravel the mysteries of the dynamo effect not only at Jupiter but those of other planets, including Earth.

Earth’s Oceans, Jupiter’s Atmosphere 

Two images of Jupiter

Lia Siegelman, a physical oceanographer and postdoctoral fellow at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego, decided to study the dynamics of Jupiter’s atmosphere after noticing that the cyclones at Jupiter’s pole appear to share similarities with ocean vortices she studied during her time as a doctoral student.

“When I saw the richness of the turbulence around the Jovian cyclones, with all the filaments and smaller eddies, it reminded me of the turbulence you see in the ocean around eddies,” said Siegelman. “These are especially evident in high-resolution satellite images of vortices in Earth’s oceans that are revealed by plankton blooms that act as tracers of the flow.”

The simplified model of Jupiter’s pole shows that geometric patterns of vortices, like those observed on Jupiter, spontaneously emerge, and survive forever. This means that the basic geometrical configuration of the planet allows these intriguing structures to form.

Although Jupiter’s energy system is on a scale much larger than Earth’s, understanding the dynamics of the Jovian atmosphere could help us understand the physical mechanisms at play on our own planet.

Arming Perseus 

The Juno team has also released its latest image of Jupiter’s faint dust ring, taken from inside the ring looking out by the spacecraft’s Stellar Reference Unit navigation camera. The brightest of the thin bands and neighboring dark regions scene in the image are linked to dust generated by two of Jupiter’s small moons, Metis and Adrastea. The image also captures the arm of the constellation Perseus.

“It is breathtaking that we can gaze at these familiar constellations from a spacecraft a half-billion miles away,” said Heidi Becker, lead co-investigator of Juno’s Stellar Reference Unit instrument at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena. “But everything looks pretty much the same as when we appreciate them from our backyards here on Earth. It’s an awe-inspiring reminder of how small we are and how much there is left to explore.”

More About the Mission

JPL, a division of Caltech in Pasadena, California, manages the Juno mission for the principal investigator, Scott J. Bolton, of the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio. Juno is part of NASA’s New Frontiers Program, which is managed at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, for the agency’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington. Lockheed Martin Space in Denver built and operates the spacecraft.

https://www.nasa.gov/juno

DC Agle
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
818-393-9011
agle@jpl.nasa.gov

Karen Fox / Alana Johnson
NASA Headquarters, Washington
301-286-6284 / 202-358-1501
karen.c.fox@nasa.gov / alana.r.johnson@nasa.gov

Deb Schmid
Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio
210-522-2254
dschmid@swri.org

2021-245: Last Updated: Dec 17, 2021: Editor: Tony Greicius

#AceNewsDesk report………….Published: Dec.20: 2021:

Editor says …Sterling Publishing & Media Service Agency is not responsible for the content of external site or from any reports, posts or links, and can also be found here on Telegram: https://t.me/acenewsdaily all of our posts fromTwitter can be found here: https://acetwitternews.wordpress.com/ and all wordpress and live posts and links here: https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

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(NASA) JUST IN: On Saturday, Dec. 4, 2021, some people in the Southern Hemisphere will have the chance to experience a total or partial eclipse of the Sun #AceNewsDesk report

#AceNewsReport – Dec.04: During a total solar eclipse, the Sun, Moon, and Earth line up so that the Sun is blocked when viewed from within the Moon’s shadow on Earth.

#AceDailyNews NASA Report: On Dec. 4, 2021 Total Solar Eclipse The only place where this total solar eclipse can be seen is Antarctica.

En Español

The Moon passing in front of the Sun, briefly blocking out the light from the Sun. "Total Solar Eclipse" appears below.
Credits: Centro de Vuelo Espacial Goddard de la NASA

A solar eclipse happens when the Moon moves between the Sun and Earth, casting a shadow on Earth, fully or partially blocking the Sun’s light in some areas. For a total solar eclipse to take place, the Sun, Moon, and Earth must be in a direct line. People located in the center of the Moon’s shadow when it hits Earth will see a total eclipse. The sky becomes very dark, as if it were dawn or dusk. Weather permitting, people in the path of a total solar eclipse can see the Sun’s corona, the outer atmosphere, which is otherwise usually obscured by the bright face of the Sun.

In some places, while viewers won’t get to see the total solar eclipse, they’ll instead experience a partial solar eclipse. This happens when the Sun, Moon, and Earth are not exactly lined up. The Sun will appear to have a dark shadow on only part of its surface. Viewers in parts of Saint Helena, Namibia, Lesotho, South Africa, South Georgia and Sandwich Islands, Crozet Islands, Falkland Islands, Chile, New Zealand, and Australia will see a partial solar eclipse on Dec. 4.

In many of these locations, the eclipse will occur before, during, and after sunrise or sunset. This means that viewers will need to get a clear view of the horizon during sunrise or sunset in order to see the eclipse.

Live Stream

To see more details about exactly where this eclipse will occur, as well as more in-depth scientific information, please visit this page.

Download this fact sheet to learn more about eclipses, eclipse safety, and fun eclipse activities:

Weather permitting, a view of the total solar eclipse from Union Glacier, Antarctica, will be streamed on YouTube and on nasa.gov/live. This stream is courtesy of Theo Boris and Christian Lockwood of the JM Pasachoff Antarctic Expedition.

The stream starts at 1:30 a.m. EST. Totality begins at 2:44 a.m. EST. The stream ends at 3:37 a.m. EST.

How to Safely Watch a Total or Partial Solar Eclipse
It is never safe to look directly at the Sun, even if the Sun is partly or mostly obscured. When viewing a partial solar eclipse, you must wear solar viewing or eclipse glasses throughout the entire eclipse if you want to face the Sun. Solar viewing or eclipses glasses are NOT regular sunglasses; regular sunglasses are not safe for viewing the Sun.

If you are in the path of a total solar eclipse, you can take off your solar viewing or eclipse glasses only when the Moon is completely blocking the Sun. To learn when you can safely remove your glasses, see this page.

If you don’t have solar viewing or eclipse glasses, you can use an alternate indirect method, such as a pinhole projector. Pinhole projectors shouldn’t be used to look directly at the Sun, but instead to project sunlight onto a surface. Read a how-to guide for creating a pinhole viewer.

In October 2023, an annular solar eclipse will cross North America. Then, just six months later, in April 2024, a total solar eclipse will cross the continent. These events provide a unique opportunity for people in the United States to experience an eclipse.

Eclipse del 4 de diciembre de 2021

El sábado 4 de diciembre de 2021, algunos habitantes del hemisferio sur tendrán la oportunidad de experimentar un eclipse de Sol total o parcial.

The Moon passing in front of the Sun, briefly blocking out the light from the Sun. "Total Solar Eclipse" appears below.
Credits: Centro de Vuelo Espacial Goddard de la NASA

Durante un eclipse solar total, el Sol, la Luna y la Tierra se alinean de modo que el Sol queda bloqueado cuando es visto desde el interior de la sombra de la Luna sobre la Tierra.

Un eclipse solar ocurre cuando la Luna se sitúa entre el Sol y la Tierra, proyectando una sombra sobre la Tierra y bloqueando total o parcialmente la luz del Sol en algunas zonas. Para que se produzca un eclipse solar total, el Sol, la Luna y la Tierra deben alineados. Los habitantes en la zona ubicada en el centro de la sombra de la Luna cuando esta cae sobre la Tierra verán un eclipse total. El cielo se volverá muy oscuro, como si fuera el amanecer o el anochecer. Si las condiciones meteorológicas lo permiten, las personas situadas en el recorrido de un eclipse solar total pueden ver la corona del Sol, o su atmósfera exterior, que de otro modo suele estar oscurecida por la cara brillante del Sol.

El único lugar donde se podrá ver este eclipse solar total es la Antártida.

En algunos lugares, aunque los observadores no verán el eclipse solar total, podrán experimentar un eclipse solar parcial. Esto ocurre cuando el Sol, la Luna y la Tierra no están exactamente alineados. El Sol parecerá tener una sombra oscura solo en una parte de su superficie. Los observadores en algunas zonas de Santa Elena, Namibia, Lesoto, Sudáfrica, Islas Georgias del Sur y Sandwich del Sur, islas Crozet, islas Malvinas, Chile, Nueva Zelanda y Australia verán un eclipse solar parcial el 4 de diciembre.

En muchos de estos lugares, el eclipse ocurrirá antes, durante y después del amanecer o el atardecer. Esto significa que los observadores deberán tener una vista despejada del horizonte durante el amanecer o el atardecer para poder ver el eclipse.

Para ver más detalles sobre dónde ocurrirá exactamente este eclipse, así como información científica más detallada (en inglés), visita esta página.

Descarga esta hoja informativa para obtener más información acerca de los eclipses, cómo protegerse durante un eclipse y actividades divertidas para el eclipse:

Transmisión en vivo

Si las condiciones meteorológicas lo permiten, se transmitirá una vista del eclipse solar total desde el glaciar Unión, en la Antártida, a través de YouTube y en nasa.gov/live. Esta transmisión es cortesía de Theo Boris y Christian Lockwood de la Expedición Antártica JM Pasachoff.

La transmisión comienza a la 1:30 a.m., hora del este de EE.UU. La totalidad comienza a las 2:44 a.m., hora del este de EE.UU. La transmisión termina a las 3:37 a.m., hora del este de EE.UU.

Cómo observar un eclipse solar total o parcial de forma segura

Nunca es seguro mirar directamente al Sol, incluso si el Sol está total o parcialmente oscurecido. Al observar un eclipse solar parcial, debes usar lentes solares o lentes para ver eclipses durante todo el eclipse si deseas ver el Sol de frente. Los lentes solares o para eclipses NO son gafas comunes; las gafas de sol comunes no son seguras para ver el Sol.

Si estás en el recorrido de un eclipse solar total, puedes quitarte los lentes solares o para eclipses solamente cuando la Luna esté bloqueando completamente al Sol. Para saber cuándo puedes quitarte los lentes de forma segura, visita esta página.

Si no tienes lentes solares o lentes para ver eclipses, puede usar un método alternativo de visión indirecta, como un proyector estenopeico (de agujero). Los proyectores estenopeicos no deben ser usados para mirar al Sol directamente, sino para proyectar la luz solar sobre una superficie. Mira este video sobre cómo hacer un proyector estenopeico para ver un eclipse solar.

Mantente seguro sin dejar de disfrutar los espectáculos estelares del Sol creando tu propio visor con unos pocos materiales sencillos.

#AceNewsDesk report ………….Published: Dec.04: 2021:

Editor says …Sterling Publishing & Media Service Agency is not responsible for the content of external site or from any reports, posts or links, and can also be found here on Telegram: https://t.me/acenewsdaily all of our posts fromTwitter can be found here: https://acetwitternews.wordpress.com/ and all wordpress and live posts and links here: https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

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SKY & TELESCOPE RESEARCH REPORT: After five years of observations, researchers now suspect that an elusive object orbiting Earth, known as 469219 Kamoʻoalewa, may be a fragment of the moon, flung out into space by one of these impacts #AceNewsDesk report

#AceNewsReport – Nov.28: The moon, Earth’s natural satellite, is riddled with craters from celestial objects crash landing on its surface …..

#AceDailyNews says a chip off the old block in this case the Moon maybe tailing the earth on its orbit around the Sun: When viewed in infrared, the asteroid had silicates and mineral characteristics like the moon, reports Jeff Hecht for Sky & Telescope. Researchers report the first detailed observations of a quasisatellite this month in Communications Earth & Environment.

An image of a full moon. The moon looks silver with grey sploches.
Elizabeth Gamillo November: 24, 2021: Not much is known about mysterious quasisatellites because of their small dimensions, distance, and ability to conceal themselves in the shadows. Kamoʻoalewa is the first quasisatellite to move within observing range of large telescopes. Gregory H. Revera via Wikimedia Commons under CC BY-SA 3.0

Researchers suspect the fragment may have been debris from a cratering event on the lunar surface

The 165-foot-long asteroid, also known as 2016 HO3, was discovered in 2016 when researchers spotted it with the Pan-STARRS PS1 telescope at the Haleakalā Observatory in Hawai’i, reports Robin George Andrews for the New York Times. The instrument specializes in detecting asteroids. However, scientists were still unsure about Kamoʻoalewa’s origin.

Kamoʻoalewa, which means wobbling object in Hawaiian, is one of Earth’s five known quasisatellites. As quasisatellites orbit the sun, they stick close to Earth but never circle our planet as they weave in and out of its own path around the sun, reports Passant Rabie for Inverse. Kamoʻoalewa swings between 9 million miles—about 38 times further than the moon—and at most, 25 million miles away from Earth, per the New York Times. Not much is known about mysterious quasisatellites because of their small dimensions, distance, and ability to conceal themselves in the shadows. Kamoʻoalewa is the first quasisatellite to move within observing range of large telescopes, Sky and Telescope reports.

“An object in a quasisatellite orbit is interesting because it’s very difficult to get into this kind of orbit — it’s not the kind of orbit that an object from the asteroid belt could easily find itself caught in,” says Richard Binzel, a planetary scientist at MIT who was not involved in the study, to Maria Temming for Science News. Because its orbit is nearly identical to Earth’s, researchers suspect Kamoʻoalewa may have come from within the Earth-moon system, Binzel adds.https://www.youtube.com/embed/SbbAnVU4rmY

Researchers began to unravel Kamoʻoalewa’s origin in 2017 after it was illuminated by the sun. Astronomers gazed at the asteroid with two telescopes in Arizona: the Large Binocular Telescope and the Lowell Discovery Telescope. They used the brief period when the sun shined its light on the space rock to identify what its is made of. The research team collected additional data in 2019 and in the spring of 2021, Inverse reports.

Light reflected off the asteroid revealed that the rock consists of silicates and minerals. There is also evidence of space weathering events, such as micrometeorite bombardment and solar wind particles, per Inverse. Kamo’oalewa reflects sunlight at long and red wavelengths, similar to grains of silicate rock brought back to Earth from the Apollo missions, Science News reports, which supports the hypothesis that the quasisatellite may actually be a chunk of the moon. The object’s slow orbit and size are also consistent with the moon origin hypothesis, Sky and Telescope reports.  

 “To me, the leading hypothesis is that it’s an ejected fragment from the moon, from a cratering event,” Binzel comments to Science News.

More evidence is needed to confirm if Kamo’oalewa is a chip off the ol’ moon—and we may find out soon. The Chinese National Space Administration is already planning to collect and return samples from Kamo’oalewa on a mission set to launch in 2024 and arrive in 2025, per Sky and Telescope.

“There’s so many different groups of asteroids in the solar system,” first author of the study Benjamin Sharkey, a graduate student at the University of Arizona, tells Inverse. “What’s really cool about this one is the fact that this is such a rarely studied type of asteroid — quasi satellites.”

#AceNewsDesk report ………..Published: Nov.28: 2021:

Editor says …Sterling Publishing & Media Service Agency is not responsible for the content of external site or from any reports, posts or links, and can also be found here on Telegram: https://t.me/acenewsdaily all of our posts fromTwitter can be found here: https://acetwitternews.wordpress.com/ and all wordpress and live posts and links here: https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

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REVELATIONS BLOOD MOON: Lunar eclipse of Beaver ‘blood’ Moon will be longest in 580 years and coincides with tradition of Native American Tribes #AceNewsDesk report

#AceNewsReport – Nov.19: The lunar eclipse will peak at around the same time as the Beaver full moon on 19 November, 2021: An almost total lunar eclipse that coincides with the full moon this week will be the longest for more than half a millennia.

#AceDailyNews says according to Independent News Report: Full moon will appear red for a time during eclipse due to Rayleigh Scattering of light: The peak of the Full Moon – known as the Beaver Moon as it traditionally coincides with Native American tribes setting their beaver traps – occurs at 8.57am GMT on Friday, but will appear full on both Thursday and Friday night

<p>The lunar eclipse will peak at around the same time as the Beaver full moon on 19 November, 2021</p>
(Getty Images/iStockphoto)

The Beaver Moon lunar eclipse will begin at 7.18am on 19 November and last just over 6 hours. The sun’s arrival shortly after it begins means viewers in the UK will miss the peak of the eclipse, which begins at 9.02am and lasts for 3 hours and 28 minutes.

Those in North and South America, as well as parts of East Asia, will have the best view of the full lunar eclipse.

It comes less than six months after the last partial lunar eclipse, which took place on 26 May, 2021. This week’s lunar eclipse falls just short of being a total eclipse with 97.4 per cent of the Moon’s diameter covered by the Earth’s shadow.

Only the southern-most edge will remain untouched by the shadow. 

The Moon will actually appear slightly red during the lunar eclipse due to a process known as Rayleigh Scattering.

“The same phenomenon that makes our sky blue and our sunsets red causes the Moon to turn red during a lunar eclipse,” Nasa explains on its website.

“Light travels in waves, and different colours of light have different physical properties. Blue light has a shorter wavelength and is scattered more easily by particles in Earth’s atmosphere than red light, which has a longer wavelength.”

Total lunar eclipse: Once in a red moon

The US space agency continues: “Red light, on the other hand, travels more directly through the atmosphere. When the Sun is overhead, we see blue light throughout the sky. But when the Sun is setting, sunlight must pass through more atmosphere and travel farther before reaching our eyes.

“During a lunar eclipse, the Moon turns red because the only sunlight reaching the Moon passes through Earth’s atmosphere. The more dust or clouds in Earth’s atmosphere during the eclipse, the redder the Moon will appear.”

It is this effect that sometimes leads lunar eclipses to be known as “blood” moons.

Weather in the UK will be mostly clear on Thursday and Friday night, according to the forecast from the Met Office, though parts of the north and west will be shrouded in cloud and could miss the celestial spectacle.

#AceNewsDesk report …………Published: Nov.19: 2021:

Editor says …Sterling Publishing & Media Service Agency is not responsible for the content of external site or from any reports, posts or links, and can also be found here on Telegram: https://t.me/acenewsdaily all of our posts fromTwitter can be found here: https://acetwitternews.wordpress.com/ and all wordpress and live posts and links here: https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

Moon
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NASA) First Woman On The Moon With Robot Sidekick RT #AceNewsDesk report

#AceNewsReport – Sept.28: Issue #1: Dream to Reality follows Callie’s trailblazing path as the first woman on the Moon. Callie and her robot sidekick, RT, overcome setbacks, disappointment, and tragedy along the way. From her childhood dreams of space travel to being selected as an astronaut candidate, Callie takes us on her journey to the Moon.

#AceDailyNews reports on NASA Issue #1: Dream to Reality for Calista Rodriguez, aka Callie, who has a heroic aim to be first woman on the moon …..READ ONLINE: https://www.nasa.gov/specials/calliefirst/

Commander Callie Rodriguez

First Woman‘s hero, Calista Rodriguez, aka Callie, has a heroic aim: to be the first woman on the Moon. Callie’s perseverance and passion allow her to make her dreams come true, but not without challenges along the way.

RT

Accompanying Callie on her journey is her robotic sidekick, RT. Named in honor of Callie’s father, Arturo, and as a nod to the “Artemis” mission, RT was built using artificial intelligence. But, not even Callie could have predicted RT’s quirky personality and humor that resulted from his unsupervised learning.

#AceNewsDesk report ………..Published: Sept.28: 2021:

Editor says …Sterling Publishing & Media Service Agency is not responsible for the content of external site or from any reports, posts or links, and can also be found here on Telegram: https://t.me/acenewsdaily all of our posts fromTwitter can be found here: https://acetwitternews.wordpress.com/ and all wordpress and live posts and links here: https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

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(NASA) JUST IN: A perfect storm of sorts, as an upcoming phase of a lunar cycle combines with rising sea levels to exacerbate the effects of climate change #AceNewsDesk report

#AceNewsReport – July.18: Throughout history, the Moon has copped more than its fair share of the blame for everything from outbreaks of erratic behaviour to fluctuations in libido.

#AceDailyNews says Moon wobble to exacerbate climate change flooding effects in next lunar cycle, NASA warns as affects of climate change take hold …acording to a finding that is contained in a study by their ‘Sea Level Change Science Team’ at the University of Hawaii, which said the main reason was the impact a “regular wobble in the Moon’s orbit” would have on tides in about 15 years’ time.

A bright glowing moon behind dark clouds at night time.
The Moon will combine with rising sea levels to drive more major flooding events.(Supplied: Julie Cronin)

But no less an authority than NASA is warning of a perfect storm of sorts, as an upcoming phase of a lunar cycle combines with rising sea levels to exacerbate the effects of climate change.

“The combination of the Moon’s gravitational pull, rising sea levels, and climate change will continue to exacerbate coastal flooding on our coastlines and across the world,” NASA administrator Bill Nelson said.

“Low-lying areas near sea level are increasingly at risk and suffering due to the increased flooding, and it will only get worse.”

Waves break around the church in the harbour at Porthleven, Cornwall south-western England.
Waves break around the church in the harbour at Porthleven, Cornwall south-western England.(AP: Ben Birchall)

The study — which coincides with deadly downpours in Germany and Belgium — forecasts “dramatic increases” in the number of floods, as well as “rapidly increasing high-tide floods” in the mid-2030s.

NASA said the main reason was a regular wobble in the Moon’s orbit — first detected in 1728 — that takes 18.6 years to complete.

The agency said what was new was how the wobble’s effects on the Moon’s gravitational pull – the main cause of Earth’s tides – would “combine with rising sea levels resulting from the planet’s warming”.

Professor Mark Howden from the Australian National University.
Professor Mark Howden is Director of the Institute for Climate, Energy and Disaster Solutions at the Australian National University.(Supplied)

Australian National University climate expert Mark Howden said the research was the first of its kind, and said the lunar phenomenon responsible was known as the Moon’s “nodal cycle”.

“The orbit of the Moon apparently changes from the perspective of Earth,” Professor Howden said.

“Sometimes it’s tilted up one way and sometimes it’s tilted the other way.”

Professor Howden said during the amplified part of the cycle, “the Moon was lining up with the Sun in terms of gravity” — with the combined effect increasing the height of high tides.

“Those cycles of the Moon have happened for probably billions of years, so they’re just part of the background world we inherit,” he said.

“The problem here is that we’re changing the sea level very quickly, so it’s going up at a record rate at the moment, and what used to be a relatively benign cyclical effect is now a ramping up effect.

“In Florida, they get what they call ‘sunny day flood events’ — it’s a day when there isn’t a storm pushing waves onto the shore, it’s simply that there’s a high tide.”

A young woman sits next to a telescope.
Kirsten Banks is a Wiradjuri astrophysicist and science communicator.(Supplied: Kirsten Banks)

Astrophysicist and science communicator Kirsten Banks said the Moon was currently in a tide-amplifying part of its cycle — but the effects were not as environmentally significant as they would be next time round.

“We are currently in an amplified stage of the cycle, but the sea levels are at an OK level so it doesn’t affect us as much as it will in the next cycle,” she said.

According to NASA’s research, floods will occur in clusters lasting “a month or longer, depending on the positions of the Moon, Earth, and the Sun”.

But Ms Banks said we should not be leaping to point the finger at celestial movements, but climate change.

“As much as it would be easy to blame the Moon, we have ourselves to blame for this one,” she said.

#AceNewsDesk report ……..Published: July.18: 2021:

Editor says …Sterling Publishing & Media Service Agency is not responsible for the content of external site or from any reports, posts or links, and can also be found here on Telegram: https://t.me/acenewsdaily all of our posts fromTwitter can be found here: https://acetwitternews.wordpress.com/ and all wordpress and live posts and links here: https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com