Categories
HISTORICAL

The Butcher of Brittany

In the west of Brittany, when the mysterious glow of a torch seemed to dance on the moor at night, it was said that it was the phantom of the Ligueur, the brigand La Fontenelle who, during the Wars of Religion, ravaged the land, indiscriminately massacring thousands of innocents and leaving intolerable misery in his wake. In some parishes wasted by him, where the population had numbered a thousand adults, he reduced it to a dozen.

The Butcher of Brittany
Categories
Australian History

Thomas Hungerford ~ Hunter River Australia

Thomas Hungerford M.L.A., after whom the township was named, was born in Ireland in 1824. He arrived in Australia with his father in 1828 and took up residence at Baerami, which formed part of a Crown grant on the Hunter River. He was educated at Maitland, and after leaving school, and following the early training in pastoral activities, he and two of his brothers set out for the north-west interior.

They were with the first party of white men to cross the Barwon and open up county on the western bank of the river.

He later took up country on the Culgoa, and later still taking up vast areas of land in New South Wales and Queensland, but retaining Baerami as the centre of his pastoral operations. During his journeys back and forth between his properties, he often camped at a spot on the Paroo River, which became know as “Hungerford’s Camp”, and later as the township of Hungerford.

Thomas Hungerford was twice elected M.L.A. for the Upper Hunter, in 1875 and again in 1885, and for the electorate of Northumberland in 1877.

His parliamentary career was marked by an earnest desire to do the best for his adopted country and in this desire he was aided by his great knowledge of the country.

He died at Ashfield in 1904, leaving a widow and 15 children.

Wording from an old newspaper clipping found in our historical files. This post may show people who have died, which may cause sadness and distress to their relatives. Care and discretion should be used when viewing the item. Text and Illustrations from earlier eras reflect the attitudes of the times and might cause offence in today’s society.

Outback Bullo Australia
Categories
Australian History

Australian History~^

Springvale Homestead is the oldest homestead still standing in the Northern Territory and it became heritage listed in 1998
Former Overland Telegraph linesman Alfred Giles constructed Springvale Homestead in 1879 following his 14-month droving expedition bringing cattle and 12,000 sheep from Adelaide.

Located on the banks of the Katherine River, Springvale was constructed using local timber and stone quarried from the area.
The homestead is home to four Indian rain trees planted by Mary Giles, wife of Alfred Giles. The trees were planted for each of their children and are perhaps the biggest trees standing in the Territory.
Giles built the homestead as part of Dr William Browne’s Northern Territory pastoral empire and it later became a stopover point for travellers passing between Darwin, South Australia and Queensland. During the Second World War, the property became an Aboriginal settlement under joint Military and Native Affairs Branch control.
In 1949 Springvale became home to notable writers Tom and Moya Ronan, with Tom writing four of his five novels in Springvale.
Archives N.T.

Categories
HISTORICAL

Sky Rock glyphs ~

The Sky Rock Petroglyphs were carved into the ancient volcanic tablelands near Bishop, California.

Their age and history are undetermined, but they are believed to be as old as 1,000 years.

Chipped into the dark desert rock in the shadow of the Sierra Nevada Range, the lighter rock beneath was exposed creating the glyphs.

While it is unknown who exactly created the Sky Rock glyphs, it is believed that the ancient ancestors of Shoshone-Paiute native people were responsible.