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FEATURED AUSTRALIA: Phillip Island Penguin Numbers Reach New Record Amid Recurring La Niña Researchers have Said

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#AceNewsRoom With ‘Kindness & Wisdom’ Oct.26, 2022 @acenewsservices

Ace News Room Cutting Floor 26/10/2022

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#AceNewsDesk – The Little Penguin population on Phillip Island has broken its second record in five months with experts suggesting La Niña is behind the boom.

Phillip Island penguin 1
The penguins had 2,000 visitors watching from the stands on Saturday night.(Source: Phillip Island Nature Parks)none

Phillip Island Nature Parks spotted 5,440 little penguins crossing Penguin Parade Beach within 50 minutes on Saturday.

The previous record, set in May, was 5,219 and was the highest number recorded since counts began in 1968.

Phillip Island Nature Parks research technical officer Paula Wasiak said this year’s numbers had shocked her.

“I never thought I’d be seeing over 5,000 penguins,” she said.

“If you’d asked me this time last year if we would have 5,000 penguins crossing the beach, I’d say ‘no way’.”

A Little Penguin waddles along the ground.
Phillip Island is home to 40,000 Little Penguins — the largest colony in the world. (Supplied: Phillip Island Nature Parks)none

Ms Wasiak said the spike was likely due to conservation efforts implemented after penguin numbers dropped in the 1980s.

“This is indicating that our research-led conservation work that we’re doing, minimising a lot of these particularly terrestrial threats and maximising their habitat is having a great pay-off,” she said.

“The penguin population did drop down in the mid-80s, down to 12,000 penguins, which now we have about 40,000 Little Penguins.”

La Niña impact

Experts are monitoring the penguins’ weights and diets, which are showing an improvement in conditions.

Monod is nice and close to the colony,” Ms. Wasiak said.

Repeated La Niña weather patterns are thought to be contributing to the swelling population, with penguins’ main food source of sardines and anchovies more plentiful during wetter conditions.

“The location of fish is dependent on oceanic conditions like storm activity, so when conditions are ideal, we tend to find fish close to shore and they’re easier to catch for the penguins,” Ms Wasiak said.

“This year from May we’ve had a small percentage of penguins doing an autumn breed and that continued until the spring breed so most of this year we’ve had rebreeding penguins and we contribute that to La Niña.

“We know that in previous years our penguins are more successful in breeding in La Niña years.”

ABC (NATURE) NEWS REPORT:

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PEACE & TRUTH

Creation @storyville

Here we are Now in that Garden of Eden well that is how this story goes ….So what would the ‘ Creation Be Like With God ‘ …

Well it needed Rain for all the animals, birds of the air to drink and of course Adam and his Mate so while we are sleeping ‘ God Looks Over His Creation ‘ with the Moonlight and is pleased and makes it rain so when we wake the Sun shines on the Righteous and we start our day with the sunlight entering our eyelids to wake us …..

The day is no longer ‘ Sweat of the Brow ‘ but Knowledge provided by the ‘ Word of God ‘ and its our job to have ‘ Dominion Over Birds of the Air & Fish of the Sea ‘ its time to eat from all the ‘ Seed Bearing Fruit ‘ and for the animals and birds to eat all that is green and both are good to eat as God made it the rain to make them grow

Its now time to 🙏🙏 and Give Thanks To God for our day and this is the ‘ Morning & Evening of the First Day and it was Good as God provided it with Kindness & Love In Peace & Truth as we lay down to sleep

AMEN

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Ace Daily News

WORLDWIDE: Ants! It turns out there are 20 quadrillion of them on Earth — or 2.5 million per human

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#AceNewsRoom With ‘Kindness & Wisdom’ Sept, 22, 2022 @acenewsservices

Ace News Room Cutting Floor 22/09/2022

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#AceNewsDesk – The world’s human population is forecast to surpass 8 billion in the coming months. But we’ve got nothing on ants.

One of the ants up close
The researchers based their analysis on 489 studies of ant populations spanning every continent where ants live.(ABC News: Brendan Esposito)none

Researchers have made the most thorough assessment to date of the global population of ants — insects that have colonised almost everywhere on the planet — and the estimated total is a mind-blowing 20 quadrillion of them, or approximately 2.5 million for every human.

It should come as little surprise considering how ubiquitous these busy and social insects are.

They have thrived since the age of dinosaurs, with the oldest-known ant fossil dating back about 100 million years to the Cretaceous Period.

“Ants certainly play a very central role in almost every terrestrial ecosystem,” said entomologist Patrick Schultheiss of Germany’s University of Würzburg and the University of Hong Kong, co-lead author of the study published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

“They are very important for nutrient cycling, decomposition processes, plant seed dispersal and the perturbation of soil.

“Ants are also an extremely diverse group of insects, with the different species fulfilling a wide range of functions.

“But most of all, it is their high abundance that makes them key ecological players.”

There are more than 12,000 known species of ants, which generally are black, brown or red in colour and possess bodies segmented into three parts.

Ranging in size from about 1 millimetre to 3 centimetres long, ants typically inhabit soil, leaf litter or decaying plants — and occasionally our kitchens.Ants generally live in colonies, sometimes consisting of millions of them divided into groups.(Supplied: David Hu)none

Ants, whose closest relatives are bees and wasps, are native to nearly everywhere on Earth, as any picnicker knows, except Antarctica, Greenland, Iceland and some island nations.

“I was amazed that the ants’ biomass was higher than that of wild mammals and birds combined, and that it reaches 20 per cent of the human biomass,” said insect ecologist and study co-lead author Sabine Nooten, also of the University of Würzburg and University of Hong Kong.

“That gives you an understanding of the scale of their impact.

“I find the enormous diversity of ants fascinating.

“They can be tiny or huge and show the most bizarre adaptations,” she added, citing a widespread ant genus called Strumigenys, known for long mouth parts with spikes used to hunt small invertebrates.

The researchers based their analysis on 489 studies of ant populations spanning every continent where ants live.

“Our dataset represents a massive collecting effort of thousands of scientists,” Dr Schultheiss said.

“We were then able to extrapolate the number of ants for different regions of the world and estimate their total global number and biomass.”Australia has a crazy ant problem

‘Most ants are actually highly beneficial’

Tropical regions were found to harbour many more ants than other regions, with forests and drylands boasting more ants than urban areas.

“There are certain parts of the world where we have little data and we cannot reach reliable estimates for all continents. Africa is one such example. We have long known that it is a very ant-rich continent, but also very under-studied,” Dr Schultheiss said.

Ants generally live in colonies, sometimes consisting of millions of them divided into groups with different roles such as workers, soldiers, and queens.

The workers, all females, care for the bigger queen and her offspring, maintain the nest, and forage for food.

Males mate with queens, then die.

“Some ants can certainly be very annoying, but that’s a very human-centered perspective,” Dr Schultheiss said.

“Most ants are actually highly beneficial, even to us humans.

“Think about the amount of organic matter that 20 quadrillion ants transport, remove, recycle and eat.

“In fact, ants are so essential for the smooth working of biological processes that they can be seen as ecosystem engineers.

“The late ant scientist EO Wilson once called them ‘the little things that run the world.'”

Dr Chris Burwell, a senior curator of insects from Queensland Museum, said the study emphasised the integral role ants play in our ecosystems.

“Having that estimate of the numbers; I know ants are important, but they are really important given the sheer number of them,” said Dr Burwell, who was not involved with the study.

“It’s not each ant as the individual, but the colony we regard as the individual. Colonies are the equivalent of an animal or a mammal in the ecosystem.

“There have been studies done where they estimate the ants walking around on the surface, and it’s a fraction of the ants living in the colony — so you’re seeing a small amount of the ants that are out there.

“That estimation compared to humans, it tells you there’s a lot of ants, but also shows you there are a lot of humans.”Think about the amount of organic matter that 20 quadrillion ants process.(Adobe Stock)none

Reuters/ABC

#AceNewsDesk report ………..Published: Sept.22: 2022:

Editor says …Sterling Publishing & Media Service Agency is not responsible for the content of external site or from any reports, posts or links, and can also be found here on Telegram: https://t.me/acenewsdaily and all wordpress and live posts and links here: https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

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Ace Daily News

FEATURED CREATION REPORT: Tiny oysters play big role in stabilizing eroding shorelines as sea-levels rise threatening communities

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#AceNewsRoom With ‘Kindness & Wisdom’ Aug.28, 2022 @acenewsservices

Ace News Room Cutting Floor 28/08/2022

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#AceNewsDesk – As sea levels rise and buildings by coasts are increasingly endangered, communities around the world are turning to the small but mighty oyster to help stabilize shorelines according to

Workers place bags of shells containing baby oysters into the water in Beach Haven, N.J. on Aug. 19, 2022 as part of a project to stabilize the shoreline by establishing oyster colonies to blunt the force of incoming waves. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry)
Workers place bags of shells containing baby oysters into the water in Beach Haven, N.J. on Aug. 19, 2022 as part of a project to stabilize the shoreline by establishing oyster colonies to blunt the force of incoming waves. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry) The Associated Press

LACEY TOWNSHIP, N.J. — Denise Vaccaro bought her home on the Jersey Shore over 20 years ago, charmed by the little beach at the end of a sandy spit on Barnegat Bay where she could sit and read while listening to the waves and enjoying the cool breezes.

That home was destroyed 10 years ago in Superstorm Sandy, and the beach she loved is also gone, claimed by rising seas that are eroding the shoreline and pushing water to porches.

“It’s so sad that this little community has lost its beach,” Vaccaro said. “People are losing their property. My home was totally destroyed. It’s a way of life that’s being lost.”

It’s a story being played out on shorelines all around the world as once idyllic beach communities are washing away, and residents are struggling to adapt.

But a partial solution being tried around the world is also being done here: establishing oyster colonies to form natural barriers that blunt the force of waves and help stabilize eroding shorelines.

Such a project is underway near Vaccaro’s rebuilt house, carried out by the American Littoral Society, which received a $1 million grant from the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. The group has been building steel wire cages, filling them with rocks and whelk shells and positioning them in rows along the shoreline of Barnegat Bay.

Tiny baby oysters, called spat, are attached to whelk shells and placed in the bay near the existing cages to further stabilize the shoreline.

The shoreline in Vaccaro’s neighborhood has lost 150 feet (46 meters) of beach since 1995, according to the Littoral Society.

In much of it, there is no sand at all; waves pound against grassy mounds that are getting smaller all the time. A shuffleboard court that used to be part of a wide beach with plenty of sand between it and the bay is now halfway submerged in water.

“Some of the people along this shoreline have seen the bay swallow their back porches, more than one,” said Julie Schumacher, habitat restoration coordinator for the Littoral Society. “The water is right up against them.”

The rows of oysters appear to be doing their job as effective breakwaters. One recent day, a strong east wind rippled the bay with whitecaps out beyond the oysters. But between the oysters and the shoreline, the water was much calmer, and waves sloped gently onto the shoreline instead of pounding against it.

As an added benefit, the oysters help improve water quality in the bay: A single oyster can filter up to 50 gallons (190 liters) of water a day.

Projects like this one are an important part of New Jersey’s coastal resilience program — using plants and shellfish beds to create “living shorelines” that complement engineered structures like sea walls and bulkheads to protect homes and people.

A few miles south, a group called ReClam the Bay is building an oyster reef to protect the shoreline of Mordecai Island, an uninhabited patch of land that in turn protects the shoreline of Beach Haven, a popular resort town on Long Beach Island.

Volunteers fill mesh bags with 35 pounds (16 kilograms) of whelk shells, to which millions of baby oysters have been attached, then sail them out to the reef a few hundred yards offshore. They’ve placed 10,000 bags of oysters and whelk shells there since 2015.

“In the last 100 years, Mordecai Island has lost 35% of its size,” said Jack Duggan, a longtime volunteer with the group. “If we do nothing, in 40 years the island will be gone — just washed over. This island protects Beach Haven from taking the force of all that wave action.”

ReClam The Bay has done a similar project establishing an oyster reef in front of a brick wall in Tuckerton, further north in the bay, and the Littoral Society has numerous other oyster projects underway. At the Naval Weapons Station Earle in Middletown, the NY/NJ Baykeeper organization is growing oysters along the heavily guarded pier and deploying them along the shoreline to protect the coast, which suffered serious erosion during Sandy.

Governments and volunteers in other places are doing the same thing.

In New York, city, state and federal agencies are building “living shorelines” along the southwestern tip of Long Island, using oysters, shells and native plants. A similar project in Delaware used 1,300 bags of shells to extend shoreline protection near Lewes CanalFront Park.

The Oyster Recovery Partnership in Maryland has placed billions of oysters on shells in Chesapeake Bay in a project set to run through 2025. In Florida, volunteers and researchers established oyster colonies along portions of the Peace River in Punta Gorda.

In California, the Wild Oyster Project is establishing reefs in San Francisco Bay for shoreline protection and water quality improvement purposes.

In Argyll, Scotland, a group called Seawilding began restoring an area in 2020 near a coastal inlet that had become degraded. They’ve restored more than 300,000 oysters there. Also in Scotland, a project aims to restore 30,000 oysters near Edinburgh.

Vaccaro realizes her New Jersey home may well depend on the success of a bunch of tiny oysters.

“If we don’t do anything, we’re not going to have any of these houses,” Vaccaro said. “In 20 years my house — which I rebuilt on pilings — could be gone again. This is why what we’re doing here is so important to me. I saw what happened and I see what can happen again.”

#AceNewsDesk report ………..Published: Aug.28:   2022:

Editor says …Sterling Publishing & Media Service Agency is not responsible for the content of external site or from any reports, posts or links, and can also be found here on Telegram: https://t.me/acenewsdaily and all wordpress and live posts and links here: https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com