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Ace Press News From Cutting Room Floor: Published: May.25: 2023:

#AceDailyNews says here’s todays Newspaper Headlines: Its all about ‘ CAR RAMMING INCIDENT AT GATE TO DOWNING STREET & MAN ARRESTED BY MET ‘ Kindness & Love says 🙏🙏’s Lord Thy God for ‘ Peace & Truth ‘ Amen

The headline in the Star reads: "Tiny Turner RIP: Simply the best"
The Star is one of a number of Thursday’s papers to pay tribute to singer Tina Turner, who died on Tuesday aged 83. The headline reads: “Simply the best”, a reference to arguably her most famous lyrics.

Tina Turner ‘simply the best’ and ‘more rate rises ahead’

The headline in the Sun reads: "Tina Turner: You were simply The Best"
The Sun has a similar headline and says Turner enjoyed an “astonishing career spanning six decades” and died at her home in Switzerland after a long illness.
The headline in the Mirror reads: "Death of a rock icon: Simply the best"
The Mirror’s headline also focuses on the lyrics and says Turner sold 100 million records after rising to fame in the 1960s and quotes Rolling Stones frontman Mick Jagger calling her an “enormously talented performer”.
The headline in the Times reads: "Whitehall clash over Johnson's Covid diary"
Ministers are on a “collision course” with the Covid-19 public inquiry, according to the Times. The paper says the Cabinet Office is considering a legal challenge after the chair of the inquiry requested access to what the paper says are “hundreds of potentially embarrassing” WhatsApp messages exchanged between former prime minister Boris Johnson and 40 other people central to Britain’s handling of the pandemic, including current prime minister Rishi Sunak. It says officials fear handing the messages over would set a precedent that all government communications should eventually be made public and harm future decision-making.
The headline in the Guardian reads: "Clamour for PM to scrap Johnson's honours list"
The Guardian says Mr Sunak is facing calls to scrap Mr Johnson’s resignation honours list after the former PM was referred to police over fresh allegations of lockdown-breaking events during the pandemic. The paper says the list is “nearing approval and could be published within weeks” but that Labour, the Liberal Democrats, and even some Conservatives think the prime minister should step in and stop the honours from going ahead.
The headline in the i reads: "New interest rate rise ahead to break 'core inflation'"
A new interest rate rise is expected to tackle persistent inflation, according to the i. It comes after figures published on Wednesday showed inflation in April was at 8.7%, down since March but higher than expected. The paper says homeowners in particular will be affected by any hike, though adds that inflation is expected to drop to 5% by the end of the year.
The headline in the Financial Times reads: "Gilt yields soar near 'mini' Budget levels as inflation data disappoints"
The Financial Times reports that gilt yields have hit levels not seen since last year’s mini-Budget. The yield on gilts is the interest paid by the UK government on its debt, so a rise in the yield can be read as a fall in investor confidence in the country’s economy. The paper quotes one analyst describing the market reaction to the figures as “an amber flag, if not a red flag” and predicting rates will have to rise “aggressively” in response.
The headline in the Telegraph reads: "Millions on jobless benefits do not have to seek work"
Around 3.7m of the 5.2m people on out-of-work benefits have an exemption from having to look for work, meaning taxpayers face “bankrolling their benefits indefinitely”, according to the Telegraph. The paper says it follows a rise in claims of mental ill-health and joint pain over lockdown and that the cost to the state now stands between £22.5bn and £26.5bn.
The headline in the Express reads: "Coming to UK! Car plant deal worth billions"
The Daily Express leads with the news that Jaguar Land Rover is set to choose the UK as the location for a new electric car battery plant. The paper says it comes after a “bidding war” with Spain and is being seen as “the most significant investment in the car industry since Nissan set up a factory in Sunderland in 1986”.
The headline in the Mail reads: "Top cop in VIP 'abuse' probe faces misconduct charges"
The officer who led a disastrous Scotland Yard investigation into false VIP sex abuse allegations is to face an investigation for gross misconduct, the Mail reports. Steve Rodhouse, a former deputy assistant commissioner of the Metropolitan Police who now serves as deputy head of the National Crime Agency, ran an operation that probed invented claims that MPs and generals abused and murdered children. The operation was largely based on claims made by Carl Beech, who was jailed in 2019 for making false allegations. The Mail says the development has “plunged Britain’s biggest police force into yet another crisis”.
The headline in the Metro reads: "Prem stars stalked by 'devil baby'"
And the Metro reports that an online influencer has pleaded guilty to waging a “terrifying stalking campaign” against England footballer Mason Mount. The paper says that model Orla Sloan, 22, changed her phone number 21 times so she could keep calling Mount after he asked her to stop texting him and blocked her number. Sloan also pleaded guilty to stalking Billy Gilmour and harassing Ben Chilwell, both teammates of Mount’s at Chelsea.

A number of papers report on figures to be released today that are expected to show net migration reached record levels last year. 

The Daily Telegraph thinks the data will “expose the chasm between the government’s tough rhetoric and the reality of an immigration system running out of control”, while the Sun warns the increase is “unsustainable for our housing stock and public services”. 

The Daily Mail says the Conservatives “really are in deep trouble” after 13 years of failing to fulfil pledges to curb migration. “If they can’t control our borders, what’s the point of them?” The paper asks. The Times urgesHome Secretary Suella Braverman to “cease posturing, park her ambitions, and get on with building a migration system that works”. 

General view of empty Covid-19 Public Inquiry room
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The Times also reports that the Cabinet Office is considering a legal challenge after the Covid public inquiry requested access to hundreds of WhatsApp messages sent between Boris Johnson and other ministers during the pandemic. Officials are said to fear that handing over full, unredacted details will set a “dangerous precedent” that all internal government communications could end up being made public, harming future decision-making. The paper says the government also believes that disclosing the messages would breach the Human Rights Act and data protection laws. Those arguments fail to persuade the Daily Mirror, which insists that, if the inquiry can’t establish the facts, lessons can’t be learned.

The Guardian leads with calls for Rishi Sunak to delay or scrap Boris Johnson’s resignation honours list following fresh allegations that the former prime minister hosted lockdown-breaking events. Opposition parties say allies of Mr Johnson should not be rewarded while he remains under investigation. A spokesman for Mr Johnson has dismissed any claims of rule breaches as a “politically motivated stitch-up”. According to the paper, some Conservatives are “privately baffled” as to why Mr Sunak would be willing to go ahead with the list, as it’s expected to hand peerages to at least three MPs and trigger potentially difficult by-elections. 

Tina Turner seen smiling with her arms outstretch, microphone in one hand, during a performance in California in 2000
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The Daily Telegraph reports that nearly four million people are being paid jobless benefits without having to look for work, following a surge in claims of poor mental health and joint pain during lockdown. The paper says the number has increased by half a million since the pandemic, when face-to-face health checks were replaced with remote assessments. Writing for the paper, former work and pensions secretary Sir Iain Duncan Smith says the government must get people languishing on sickness benefit back to work, a move that he says would help improve their health and reduce dependency.

Images of singer Tina Turner, who died on Tuesday aged 83, feature on many of the front pages. Several headlines nod to one of her most well-known hits, saying: “Simply The Best”. The Daily Mirror hails her “unique” voice, “breathtaking” stage presence and “sublime” music, but adds that what really made her a legend “was her sheer strength of character”. 

Alluding to another hit song, the Daily Express calls her “the hero we needed” and pays tribute to her ability to “inspire young performers to this day”. The Daily Mail says she was a “superstar” and “the undisputed queen of stadium rock who invented Girl Power before the Spice Girls were even born”.

The headline in the Sun reads: "Maddie: Riddle of the lake"
A number of Tuesday’s papers lead with the news that German police investigating the disappearance of Madeleine McCann have launched a search of a reservoir in Portugal. The Sun says the reservoir is 31 miles from where Madeleine vanished in 2007 and quotes a source describing the search as a “major development”.
The headline in the Mirror reads: "Maddie cops search lake"
The operation is the “first major search for Madeleine in nine years”, according to the Daily Mirror. The paper says that the prime suspect in the case, convicted sex offender Christian Brueckner, described the reservoir as his “little paradise”.
The headline in the Metro reads: "New hunt for Maddie"
The Metro says that the reservoir is near the town of Silves in the Algarve and that police have sealed off a mile-long stretch of its shoreline. It adds that divers will explore water close to a dam and that digs are also expected in a wooded area nearby.
The headline in the Express reads: "Police search reservoir for Madeleine"
Divers searched the reservoir once before in 2008 following an “underworld tip-off”, according to the Daily Express. The paper says that a drought in the area means water levels at the reservoir are unusually low and that detectives from Scotland Yard are understood to be on hand with a “watching brief”.
The headline in the Star reads: "Maddie cops dig at reservoir"
The Star’s front page carries a picture of the remote lake and another of a number of police around a tent at the site of the search.
The headline in the i reads: "No 10 leaves Braverman waiting on her future"
Away from the search, Prime Minister Rishi Sunak is under “growing pressure” to act over reports Home Secretary Suella Braverman asked civil servants to arrange a one-on-one speed awareness course for her, according to the i. The paper says Sunak has delayed a key decision to launch an ethics inquiry into the claims but that he is irritated the row has overshadowed the G7 summit.
The headline in the Mail reads: "Revealed: Plot to drive out equality chief who's standing up for women"
The Daily Mail says that staff at the equalities watchdog, the Equality and Human Rights Commission, have been accused of trying to oust chairwoman Baroness Falkner over her stance on transgender issues. The paper says a dossier of more than 40 complaints against the peer has been compiled but that some within the organisation think she is being targeted because she “backed legal reforms guarding the right of biological women in single-sex space such as hospital wards and toilets”.
The headline in the Telegraph reads: "London 'left behind' by financial rival cities"
The head of Britain’s biggest investment company has said London is falling behind rival financial centres because of “over-regulation” and “misguided political interventions”, according to the Daily Telegraph. Speaking to the paper, Sir Nigel Wilson, chief executive at Legal & General, which manages £1.2tn of savers’ money, says the country largely missed out on the technology boom of the early 2000s and risks being left behind again because it is failing to help fledging businesses raise money or float on the stock market.
The headline in the Times reads: "Green quango blamed for blocking new homes"
The Times says that Natural England, the public body responsible for protecting the country’s landscape, has been accused of blocking 160,000 new homes and helping to push housebuilding to its lowest levels since the 1920s. The paper says the agency has led 74 councils to block developments that couldn’t show they would not pollute local water systems and that the cost of meeting the requirement makes housebuilding “impracticable”.
The headline in the Guardian reads: "Thousands of hospital staff report claims of sexual abuse by patients"
An investigation has found that thousands of hospital staff are reporting claims of sexual assaults and harassment by patients, according to the Guardian. The paper says that more than 20,000 incidents of sexual violence and misconduct, including rape, assault, and stalking, were recorded by 212 NHS trusts in England in the five years to 2022. Deeba Syed, a senior legal officer at the Rights of Woman helpline, also tells the paper that the organisation hears “worrying reports of women feeling pressured into not raising formal grievances” following incidents.
The headline in the Financial Times reads: "Meta handed record €1.2bn European fine over transatlantic data transfers"
And the Financial Times leads with a €1.2bn (£1.0bn) fine handed to Meta, the owner of Facebook, by the European Union over alleged violations of rules requiring safeguards for transfers of personal data to the United States. The paper says the company has been given five months to suspend such transfers, though adds that it is expected to appeal against the decision.

A number of Tuesday’s papers lead with the news that German police investigating the 2007 disappearance of Madeleine McCann have launched a search of a reservoir in Portugal. 

The Daily Mirror says it isn’t clear whether the search is based on new evidence or has been planned for months. According to the Daily Express, the water level at the reservoir is very low at the moment because of a drought. The Sun says it’s been told by a source that the search is “a major development” and wouldn’t have been ordered “if they were not acting on information”.

The i says Prime Minister Rishi Sunak is under “growing pressure” to act over reports Home Secretary Suella Braverman asked civil servants to arrange a one-on-one speed awareness course for her. The paper says Mr Sunak has demanded that Ms Braverman provide him with more information before he decides whether to launch an investigation. The Sun says she’s been “left dangling”.

The Times says the prime minister is considering e-mails sent to the Cabinet Office by civil servants at the time of the request raising concerns about the home secretary’s conduct. The paper says the e-mails are “at odds with claims from Braverman’s allies, who say she asked civil servants only for advice”. 

An editorial in the Daily Express argues that the home secretary should be left alone to concentrate on what it calls her most important task – tackling the problem of migrants arriving in small boats. The paper says that without her in the post, the task of stopping the boats might fall to someone less able to deal with the crisis. 

An aerial view of a reservoir in Portugal where police investigating the disappearance of Madeleine McCann have launched a new search
Police investigating the disappearance of Madeleine McCann have launched a search of a reservoir near the town of Silves in Portugal

The Daily Mail says that staff at the equalities watchdog, the Equality and Human Rights Commission, have been accused of trying to oust chairwoman Baroness Falkner over her stance on transgender issues. The paper says a dossier of more than 40 complaints against the peer has been compiled but that some within the organisation think she is being targeted because she “backed legal reforms guarding the right of biological women in single-sex space such as hospital wards and toilets”. 

A report in the Guardian questions why Foreign Secretary James Cleverly has hired a luxurious private jet – reportedly costing more than £10,000 an hour – for his eight-day tour of the Caribbean and Latin America. The Foreign Office said hiring the plane was the most time-effective way to organise the tour. 

Labour’s shadow chancellor, Rachel Reeves, is also facing criticism over a flight across the Atlantic. The Daily Telegraph says she flew to New York in BA’s Club World Business Class suite at a cost of around £4,000 and that Labour has refused to say who funded the trip. 

And the Financial Times says Germany has recorded its highest level of foreign investment last year, partly because of a surge in UK companies setting up bases there to retain a presence in the EU after Brexit. The paper reports that British firms invested in 170 projects. One of the biggest was by the owner of Sports Direct, Frasers Group, which is building a new distribution centre. 

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